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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Preservation North Carolina
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Record #:
15774
Abstract:
The Cemetery Survey and Stewardship Program was developed by the Office of Archives and History to preserve and protect North Carolina's overlooked cemeteries. Guardianship of these cemeteries was largely under the charge of local historians and as of 2002 seventeen counties had complete survey records. The program aims to organize records, provide technical advice, and create a database to account for these resources before any are lost.
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Record #:
30539
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Viewing NC places through its architecture can provide information on past ways of life and their changes though time. Preservation should not only focus on the best examples of architectural types, as the commonness in which a style was used, and its variations are all part of its significance.
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Record #:
34518
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A long history of houses and properties being donated to Preservation North Carolina has allowed for several of these places to be protected and refurbished. Whether a family wants to fully donate or sell for a reduced rate, Preservation North Carolina can make sure that the property is given a new life with enthusiastic preservationists.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 148 Issue , Winter 2014-2015, p6-9, il, por
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Record #:
34523
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In 1979, a bill was passed in the North Carolina that allowed for local governments to sell publicly owned historic properties to nonprofit preservation organizations without having to go to auction. Thirty years on, PNC has acquired over thirty properties from local governments and has been able to sell them or restore them under this legislation.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 137, Spring 2010, p3-4, il
Record #:
34522
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The head of Preservation North Carolina reflects on the way historic preservation has helped in “keeping North Carolina, North Carolina”. With countless examples of the preservation projects occurring all over the state, he determines that preservation efforts has helped the local economy, revamp the historic buildings, incorporated more diverse narratives into historical research, and introduced more environmentally friendly practices to neighborhoods across the state.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 147 Issue , Fall 2014, p3-13, il
Record #:
34519
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Hoping to Revitalize East Durham (RED), the PNC had two classes from UNC Department of City and Regional Planning determine a revitalization plan for the historic neighborhood. They determined that PNC should acquire specific houses in a targeted area, refurbish them, and sell them to prospective home owners. This effort has led to four properties being sold and three more renovations in progress.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 148 Issue , Winter 2014-2015, p10-13, il
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Record #:
34520
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Due to the revolving funds and hard work of the PNC, hundreds of properties have been saved from certain foreclosure and condemnation. This article features work done on six historic structures that have recently been saved by PNC and bought by private homeowners. Ranging from Civil War Union field hospitals to a funeral home in Wilmington, these properties are given new life by homeowners.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 148 Issue , Winter 2014-2015, p16-19, il, por
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Record #:
34524
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In Chapel Hill and Edenton, two historically significant houses were hit by trees and close to being condemned. But with help of local volunteers and shareholders, both houses were able to be repaired and restored to their former glory.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 138 Issue , Spring 2011, p3-4, il
Record #:
34521
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Using examples from other PNC projects, this article outlines the practicality of using a preservation easement as a protective tool. Easements, or legal restrictions, allow for historic properties to be protected from commercial or corporate enterprises that wish to tear down the structures.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 148 Issue , Winter 2014-2015, p20-23, il
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Record #:
34525
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Despite the recession, this may be the time to buy historic houses in need of restoration. In North Carolina, tax incentives, lower renovation costs, reasonable purchase prices, and low interest rates can help homeowners make the most of their restoration projects.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 136 Issue , Fall 2009, p3-4, il
Record #:
34536
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With the decline of the house museums that were once popular around the country, PNC must decide the fates of two bequeathed houses, El Nido and the Banker’s House. Unable to sell the properties due to the wishes of the deceased, PNC has decided to make the Banker’s House their southwest regional office, and to develop a resident curatorship for El Nido. These examples have led to PNC creating conditions of acceptance for large gifts.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 132 Issue , Fall 2007, p3-6, il, por
Record #:
34528
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PNC has acquired four of North Carolina’s most important historic homes with the intent to restore them to their former state. Restoration projects are being undertaken at the Bellamy Mansion, Coolmore Plantation, Banker’s House, and El Nido; Bellamy Mansion is a museum open to the public, but under PNC’s care, the other three will likely not be open to the public.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 134 Issue , Fall 2008, p9-10, il
Record #:
34537
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An argument is made that older, historic windows are more energy efficient than replacing them with new ones that tout being environmentally friendly. Before replacing historic windows, one should look at factors such as energy already expended to create and install the window, reusability or recyclability of the windows, and quality of the new windows over the historic ones. By repairing historic windows, homeowners can save money and improve energy efficiency while still maintaining the historic character and value.
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North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 132 Issue , Fall 2007, p8-9, il