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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Howard, J. Myrick
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Record #:
1325
Author(s):
Abstract:
For thirty-five years, the late Helen Watkins lovingly nurtured her Hillsborough garden of roses and camellias at the site of her historic home, Chatwood.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 3, June 1993, p24-27, por
Record #:
1338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Exemplifying the trend for North Carolina's colleges and universities to value and renovate their older buildings, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has renovated Old East, the oldest state university-owned building in the country.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Feb 1994, p22-27, il
Record #:
1455
Author(s):
Abstract:
Flat Rock was developed during the 19th-century by Charlestonians who sought relief from the summer heat. Modern development threatens to destroy the ambiance they created.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p24-27, il
Record #:
1576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Architectural historian Laura Phillips has found imaginative examples of decorative painted finishes in Edgecombe County houses.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 2, Apr 1993, p22-25, il
Record #:
4469
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colleges and universities view their historic buildings in one of two ways. Either they are an asset, providing the school with continuity and enrichment, or they are seen as a place of use until a new building can be constructed. Howard compares Brown University, where the old buildings are preserved, with the University of North Carolina where many are not.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 114, Winter 1999, p3, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
8870
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preservation North Carolina started its Endangered Properties Program in 1977. Then the first criteria for preservation was that the property had to be endangered. In 2007, North Carolina is experiencing explosive growth and the definition of what constitutes an endangered property has changed. Myrick discusses this new endangered definition, such as historic buildings sited on highly developable land; historic buildings located on agricultural land; and historic buildings that are candidates for salvage and reuse of their contents.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 131, Spring 2007, p3-6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
15816
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given rising costs of energy, many homeowners are taking measures to conserve energy. Older homes can be made more energy efficient without lessening the value of the structure.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Fall 1978, p46-53, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
18362
Author(s):
Abstract:
Government officials and citizens who are interested in conserving the history and beauty of their communities now have a panoply of tools available to them in North Carolina's planning legislation. This article describes the preservation activities that are being undertaken in the state and the devices that are being used for conserving beauty and improving appearance.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Spring 1980, p15-20, f
Record #:
18817
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preservation easements, a legal right given by a property owner to a qualified organization to prevent changes, has been referred to as the best tax shelter in history. However, in North Carolina preservation, easements have not enjoyed as widespread use as in other parts of the east coast.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 47, Feb 1984, p1, 10, f
Record #:
18911
Author(s):
Abstract:
J. Myrick Howard, Executive Director of Preservation North Carolina, details the roller coaster of 1993 for North Carolina historic preservation.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 92, Spring 1994, p2-4, f
Record #:
18938
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the growth of urban sprawl in North Carolina, Howard discusses how historic preservation can make smarter growth in the state even smarter.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 113, Fall 1999, p1-3, f
Record #:
34523
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1979, a bill was passed in the North Carolina that allowed for local governments to sell publicly owned historic properties to nonprofit preservation organizations without having to go to auction. Thirty years on, PNC has acquired over thirty properties from local governments and has been able to sell them or restore them under this legislation.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 137, Spring 2010, p3-4, il
Record #:
34522
Author(s):
Abstract:
The head of Preservation North Carolina reflects on the way historic preservation has helped in “keeping North Carolina, North Carolina”. With countless examples of the preservation projects occurring all over the state, he determines that preservation efforts has helped the local economy, revamp the historic buildings, incorporated more diverse narratives into historical research, and introduced more environmentally friendly practices to neighborhoods across the state.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 147 Issue , Fall 2014, p3-13, il
Record #:
34525
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the recession, this may be the time to buy historic houses in need of restoration. In North Carolina, tax incentives, lower renovation costs, reasonable purchase prices, and low interest rates can help homeowners make the most of their restoration projects.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 136 Issue , Fall 2009, p3-4, il
Record #:
34536
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the decline of the house museums that were once popular around the country, PNC must decide the fates of two bequeathed houses, El Nido and the Banker’s House. Unable to sell the properties due to the wishes of the deceased, PNC has decided to make the Banker’s House their southwest regional office, and to develop a resident curatorship for El Nido. These examples have led to PNC creating conditions of acceptance for large gifts.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. 132 Issue , Fall 2007, p3-6, il, por