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16 results for Nuclear energy
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Record #:
13392
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Long a leader in technological developments in the South, State College has accepted the challenge of the Atomic era by pioneering in the establishment of the first non-Atomic Energy Commission research and training project in Nuclear Engineering in the country.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 19, Oct 1953, p1-2, 12-13, f
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Record #:
21658
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This article examines the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the scandal that surrounded it after it awarded a fellowship to Hans Freistat in 1948. Freistat, an Austrian doctoral student and teaching assistant in physics at the University of North Carolina, was also a member of the Communist Party. After he was awarded the fellowship, North Carolina senator Clyde R. Hoey called for a congressional investigation into the AEC's methodology of awarding fellowships. During the investigation and after, Freistat lost both the fellowship and his teaching position, Congress instituted tougher background checks into fellowship candidates, and AEC chairman David E. Lilienthal resigned.
Record #:
21855
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After the US Department of Energy announced plans to build a nuclear waste depository in western North Carolina, residents quickly resisted the idea. Still mindful of accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, North Carolina residents cited potential economic loss, transportation danger and earthquake potential as reasons to not put a depository in the state. The Department of Energy backed off and instead created a nuclear waste site in Nevada.
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Record #:
27687
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Duke Energy has adjusted to the Obama Administration’s Clean Power Plan to reduce the emission of Carbon-dioxide from coal-fired electric generation plants. The company has found other ways to create energy for its customers, including using solar power, building natural-gas plants, and using nuclear energy.
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Record #:
27689
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Nuclear energy has proven to be a safe, clean, and reliable alternative form of energy. Nuclear plants in North Carolina have been successful, but there is still some resistance to using nuclear power.
Record #:
29770
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The biggest economic development in southeastern North Carolina will also create and new industry for the area. The GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy plant in Castle Hayne, North Carolina will expand its operations to include laser technology in order to extract uranium.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p28, 30, por, map
Record #:
30424
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In 1953 a prototype of an atomic power submarine was secretly and successfully launched. It is argued then that there not much of a step between this submarine and atomic-powered ships, airplanes or trains, and that atomic energy maybe the solution to some of the world's most difficult problems: use of sea water for industrial and agricultural use and disposal of human and industrial wastes. With the rising prices of conventional energy, the fall of atomic energy prices, and increasing demand for energy in general, atomic power is being considered an alternative revolution.
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Record #:
30704
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In a television interview, North Carolina Congressman Carl Durham discussed public hearings on the progress of nuclear energy in the United States. As the Congressional authority on nuclear power, Durham argued that despite the United State's dependence on oil and coal, the potential for a shift to nuclear power is highly likely, given the advances the country is making in the research.
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Record #:
30769
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Power companies in North and South Carolina along with Virginia have joined in the development of a nuclear-fired plant for generating electricity. The objectives of the corporation are to research and study economic ways to produce and utilize nuclear material and atomic energy for usable energy.
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Record #:
30861
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Approximately half of the electricity distributed by North Carolina’s electric cooperatives comes from carbon-free nuclear power sources. In 1981, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives became a part owner of Catawba Nuclear Station in York County, South Carolina. Since then, the Catawba generating station has been considered one of the nation’s most efficient plants.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Aug 2009, p12-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30983
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Over the years, nuclear power plants have been providing a large share of North Carolina’s electricity. As climate change continues to spur both political and public debate, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are supporting the research of new technologies and renewable energy resources in an effort to ensure affordable power while balancing environmental concerns. This article discusses nuclear power generation and its role in the future.
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Record #:
31364
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The Catawba Nuclear Station, which is partially owned by North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations, passed another milestone July 20 on its way to commercial operation sometime in 1985. The milestone was successful fuel-loading prior to low-power testing. The fuel rods will increase the utility’s ability to generate electricity by sixteen-percent.
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Record #:
31576
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The North Carolina Association of Electric Cooperatives Women’s Committee annual fall workshop was held in Greensboro, October 10-11. The workshop featured energy industry speakers who discussed the basics of nuclear energy, rural power supply, and alternative energy sources. Sandra Plant, information officer for the controversial Clinch River Breeder Reactor project in Tennessee, discussed how the breeder operates and safety of nuclear power production.
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Record #:
35557
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The need for electricity was pressing—twofold more every seven years for rapidly growing areas. The problems contributing to the crisis: shortage of fossil fuels and residents’ reluctance to have electric generating station in their backyard. Westinghouse Electric Company, coupled with Offshore Power Systems, proved the crisis could be averted, the problems were not insurmountable. Their solution for anyone seeking an alternative fuel source and/or not wanting generating stations within sight: nuclear power plants offshore.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p18-19, 42-44
Record #:
38061
Abstract:
Working apace during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to bring electrical power to North Carolina were linesmen. As the author illuminated, their job was dangerous and goal formidable. Despite President Roosevelt’s creation of the Rural Electrification Authority in the 1930s, three decades passed before almost every residence was electrified.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 6, November 2014, p38-40, 42, 44, 46-47 Periodical Website