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15 results for New Bern--Historical buildings
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Record #:
12367
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a few months, restored Tryon Palace in New Bern, will become one of the most visited places in North Carolina. A gift to the people from Mrs. Maude Moore Latham, the restoration project will cost upwards of $2 million dollars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 23, Apr 1958, p15, il
Full Text:
Record #:
27894
Author(s):
Abstract:
The New Bern Academy is one of the few remaining Federal-style public buildings in North Carolina, and the first school in the state to have been established by law. Founded in 1764, it ranks as one of the oldest secondary schools in the nation. The building became a museum in 1990 and exhibits the history of New Bern.
Source:
Record #:
27995
Abstract:
The United States District Court was established in New Bern, North Carolina in 1790. Except during the Civil War, federal court has been held in New Bern ever since. Murals and architecture displayed by the Federal Building depict the history and symbolism of New Bern and the United States.
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Record #:
31621
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern is a town credited with twenty-eight significant historic “firsts”, such as the First Provincial Congress held in 1774, the state’s first church founded in 1750, and the invention of Pepsi-Cola in 1898. New Bern was also the first town in the country to celebrate the 1776 Bicentennial, and is said to have more original old buildings than any other in the nation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, July 1976, p6-8, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36989
Abstract:
A pioneering female photographer, with a body of work including 600,000 photographs, also left behind the clapboard house where her career began. Among the accomplishments her historic house became the site of was designing the first Pepsi-Cola logo for the pharmacist who invented the beverage.
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29
Record #:
36134
Author(s):
Abstract:
All Saints Chapel, built in the late 1890s and constructed in the Carpenter Gothic Style, was larger than its exterior suggested. As for other aspects of its appearance, longtime residents recall the exterior as painted white, but research by the author asserted otherwise. In fact, the recent repainting has returned the church to its original color, as well as the color scheme popular during the period in which the church was built.
Record #:
36131
Author(s):
Abstract:
The church has had a broad appeal, in its denomination, the combined Christian Church and First Disciples of Christ, touted as the “largest denomination founded on American soil.” Its foundation was complete by the early nineteenth century, but it experienced a crumbling in terms of membership in the 1960s and early 1970s. By the new decade, though, it had rebuilt itself, congregation and worship space wise.
Record #:
36130
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moving day involved the Coor-Cook House, whose construction began in the 1790s, and Law Office, built in the 1850s. The two buildings, moved in 1981, were purchased by the Historic New Bern Foundation. The buildings’ value was expressed in the Foundation not wanting them demolished to make way for parking lots or an extension of the court house.
Record #:
36142
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historic homes such as the Isaac Taylor House and John Wright Stanly House had another value to the community: tales of their reputed hauntings. Other house related horror stories noted were a ghost encountered at the Cherry Point Marine Corp Air Station and vigil involving a parrot.
Record #:
36138
Author(s):
Abstract:
The success of this industry the past two centuries could be attributed to the beauty and accessibility of this region, made possible through several types of local endeavors. Societies such as New Bern Historic Society and the town’s five museums preserve its cultural significance. Businesses such as Swiss Bear, Inc. promoted revitalization of its downtown economy. Events included Tryon Palace tours and annual Historic Homes and Gardens Tour.
Record #:
36140
Author(s):
Abstract:
The profile honored Minnette Chapman Duffy, who played an important role in the preservation of New Bern’s history. It discussed her Tennessee origins, introduction to New Bern via marriage, receiving the First Annual Gold Medal, and conversion of the Stanly House into the public library. Included was a photo of a profile-style painting of Duffy, originally hung in the Attmore-Oliver House and later donated to the New Bern Historical Society.
Record #:
36148
Abstract:
The window, located on the roof of the William B. Blades House, offered an extensive look into history. It had a bird’s eye view of the Great Fire of 1922, trio of hurricanes, Tryon Palace’s construction, the Bicentennial celebration, and election of the town’s first black mayor. Nationally famous figures referenced by this poem’s fifth grade author included Babe Ruth, President Harry S. Truman, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Record #:
36150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Training of a sort for his current work started with experience as a Boy Scout volunteer guide. This insider’s perspective of the Harvey Mansion discloses its history, including its time as an apartment building. Also explored were architectural aspects such as closet space, which the author declared was once an amenity that only the wealthy could afford.
Record #:
36151
Author(s):
Abstract:
The housed, a representative of late eighteenth century life, lost a fragment of its post-Colonial origins through the roof’s remodeling. Another fragment of that time lost was the maritime commerce that made the building of the house possible for John Harvey.