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9 results for Portraits
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Record #:
9200
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Beverly Jones Cox graduated from East Carolina University in 1967. For almost forty years she has worked for the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. She was named curator of exhibitions after being there seven years and served in that capacity till 2000, when she was named director of collections and exhibitions.
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Record #:
16534
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Alex B. \"Andy\" Andrews IV, the namesake and descendant of railroad magnate Col. Alex B. Andrews, one of North Carolina's most significant personages of the 19th century, has commissioned the restoration of a painting of his illustrious ancestor completed in 1880 by artist William Garl Brown, Jr. Andrews is donating the restored painting to the NC Museum of History.
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Record #:
16689
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Over 60 descendants of John Burgwin (Burgwyn) gathered at the North Carolina Museum of Art for the presentation of a portrait of their colonial ancestor by English painter John Singleton Copley, one of the best-known artists of the 18th century. John Burgwin, born in Wales, became a successful businessman and officer-holder in colonial North Carolina.
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Record #:
19050
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Descendants of the Holland family of New Bern donated a life-sized portrait of a young Craven County woman to Tryon Palace. Efforts to conserve this portrait have been very fruitful.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 10 Issue 4, Summer 2010, p10-17, f
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Record #:
19030
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Tryon Palace has recently acquired the small likeness of a Confederate soldier for its growing collection of Civil War artifacts. The portrait has been identified as George Stanley Dewey of Craven County.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Winter 2007, p12-13, f
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Record #:
9052
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Pictures of King George III and Queen Charlotte were returned to their home in the Salisbury tavern in 1977. During the Revolutionary War, American General Nathaniel Greene stopped by the tavern, owned by the Steele family, and wrote “O George, hide they face and mourn” on the back of his portrait. After Mrs. Steele's death, the portraits passed to David L. Swain, president of the University of North Carolina. The pictures were later auctioned to William J. Andrews in 1883, who kept the pictures in his family in California until 1977, when the Neel family, descendants of the Steeles, bought the portraits and returned them to the tavern wall.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 10, Mar 1979, p18-19, il
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Record #:
27584
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Researchers at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina identified the work of Mary Roberts as America’s earliest known woman miniaturist. This was revealed after discovery of a miniature portrait-painting signed by Roberts during the 1740s in Charleston, South Carolina.
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Record #:
27862
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Joseph-Pierre Picot de Limoëlan de Clorivière was a miniature portrait artist who fled to Georgia from France after conspiring to assassinate Napleon Bonaparte in 1800. Joseph-Pierre became a pastor and had a pivotal influence on the spirituality, curriculum and architecture of the Visitation Monastery in Georgetown, D.C. New accounts of his work are stored at the monastery and at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
36989
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A pioneering female photographer, with a body of work including 600,000 photographs, also left behind the clapboard house where her career began. Among the accomplishments her historic house became the site of was designing the first Pepsi-Cola logo for the pharmacist who invented the beverage.