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12 results for Mules
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Record #:
29161
Abstract:
Once a ubitquitous sight in the North Carolina countryside until the 1960s, mules have been mostly supplanted by tractors and mechanization. But Wayne Hussey's mules are still talk of the town at Benson's Mules Days, which celebrates its 68th anniversary.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p192-194, 196, 198, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wayne Hussey of Randolph County embraces the traditional mule and plow method of tilling his farmland. North Carolina was one of the last states to employ the use of mules until 1950, when tractors replaced most of the farm labor. But Hussey has kept his mules working the fields and going on the road to showcase in competitions.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p192-198, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38276
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Abstract:
What makes a farm work, according to the author, is the relationship between farmers and tractors. Another relationship discussed by Hughes reflects the tractor’s enduring importance in North Carolina. An illustration for this relationship is the anecdote about a farmer, his tractor, and child he trusted to operate it. Illustrations of the tractor’s importance in North Carolina is many counties having multiple tractor dealerships, her comparison between tractor and car dealerships, and assertion tractor dealerships are often community centers and places of business.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 5, Oct 2012, p174-176, 178-184, 186-188, 190, 192 Periodical Website
Record #:
9744
Abstract:
Mules were vital to the late 19th and early 20th-century southern farming community. While North Carolina was not known for mule breeding, it was known for mule trading. By 1960, the mule was almost gone, replaced in the state by mechanization. Now the mule is making a comeback in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p30-31, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9428
Abstract:
Benson in Johnston County is an example of a small agricultural community that once depended on the mule for farming and mule-trading business for economic sustenance. Those days have long since passed, but each September for the past fifty-eight years, Benson has celebrated its mule history with a festival called Mule Days. The festival attracts between 50,000 to 70,000 people from all over the country.
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Record #:
8675
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the last weekend of September, Mule Days is held in Benson. Conceived in 1949 by Nowell Smith, Jr., Mule Days is a four-day long festival. There are beauty pageants, livestock sales, nightly dancing, and a three-day rodeo. Mrs. Nowell Smith heads the annual parade as Grand Marshal. Thousands of people attend the festival each year. Although North Carolina's mule population dwindled in the past, it has grown steadily in the last twenty years, spurred in part by Mule Days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Sept 1981, p14-15, 32, il
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Record #:
35918
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Abstract:
With five decades of mule trading experience, he had many secrets of success to share. Included were prime physical features, prices, and purposes for the farm animal reputed as a hard worker.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p56-57
Subject(s):
Record #:
35844
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mules have a longtime reputation among farmers as strong and stubborn. Add to this homing, or the ability to find their way to the homestead. As for how hybrid beasts like Belle was able to, explanations were offered such as backtracking, sniffing out their own tracks, and night eyes, what the author described as “horn like patches” on their inner forelegs, slightly above the knees.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p28-29
Record #:
9246
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the mule population has declined in recent decades, their number is starting to slowly increase. Mules vary greatly in intelligence but are generally hard-working. After almost becoming extinct in post World War II America, mule day celebrations held around the country are fueling a new interest in these creatures.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 6, Nov 1979, p22-24, 38, il
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Record #:
9815
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Abstract:
During the last weekend of September, Mule Days is held in Benson. Conceived in 1949 by Garland McLamb, Mule Days is a four-day long festival designed for people to buy, sell, and pay homage to the mules. The festival is now in its twenty-sixth year and attracted over 50,000 people in 1974. Although North Carolina's mule population dwindled in the past, it has grown steadily in the last twenty years, spurred in part by Mule Days.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 3, Aug 1975, p18-20, il
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Record #:
35511
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Abstract:
In noting how mules have been an invaluable and longtime source of labor, the author proved they has earned a rightful place in history, whether on the plantation or family farm, whether in the US South or Biblical Middle East. Going further in proving the hybrid creature’s value, Jones provided information that refuted common myths (for example, only males are sterile) and ways to keep this “historically industrious” animal healthy.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p22-25
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Record #:
35618
Abstract:
Ray Lum started trading horses and mules when he was a teenager, and continued to do so even after most farming techniques turned to mechanical devices. Transcribed from an interview with Mr. Lum, the author included a glossary for the vernacular terms.
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