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8 results for Agriculture--North Carolina--History
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Record #:
12131
Abstract:
The text and illustrations from Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, 20 October 1866, offers a graphic contemporary description of a once important North Carolina crop.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 7, Aug 1956, p20-21, il
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Record #:
13182
Author(s):
Abstract:
The traditions of the modern South began in the fields of cotton and tobacco. The backbone of industry in the state traces back to literate and articulate farm boys such as Colonel L.L. Polk and Benjamin Kilgore. Changes have taken place over decades, and none mirror the change better than the magazine, The Progressive Farmer, started by Colonel Polk in 1886.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 20, Feb 1956, p11-12, il
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Record #:
13433
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Abstract:
This series was originally published in \"Heart of the Alleghanies\" in 1881, giving a picture of North Carolina resources as drawn by two travelers from the North. Ziegler and Crosscup document North Carolina from a climatical and botanical point of view in general, but keep their observations in this record of their series focused on agriculture. Observations include the growth of tobacco production, and the rise of tobacco producing havens such as Hickory and Shelby.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 2, June 1958, p12
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Record #:
20184
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Abstract:
Agricultural practices underwent revolutionary changes in the US during the antebellum period. However, in North Carolina many farmers were attached to customary ways and reluctant to change. There were some, however, who undertook to profit by agricultural reform. Sidney Weller of Halifax County became the head of agricultural reform in North Carolina, promoting the success he achieved in restoring his acres through new techniques and products.
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Record #:
4403
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Abstract:
A number of farmers in antebellum North Carolina, including Paul C. Cameron, preached agriculture reform. They felt farming would not improve until farmers used \"book farming\", experimented with fertilizers, and upgraded their livestock. Between 1840 and 1860, these approaches took hold, and production of cotton, tobacco, rice, and corn increased, as did farm income. Unfortunately the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 destroyed this progress.
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Record #:
29161
Abstract:
Once a ubitquitous sight in the North Carolina countryside until the 1960s, mules have been mostly supplanted by tractors and mechanization. But Wayne Hussey's mules are still talk of the town at Benson's Mules Days, which celebrates its 68th anniversary.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p192-194, 196, 198, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31600
Author(s):
Abstract:
A century ago, 108 brands of fertilizer were being sold in North Carolina, including low quality products and swindles. As a result of farmers’ complaints, the legislature passed an act setting up an Agricultural Experiment and Fertilizer Control System. This article covers the history and current operations of the program.
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Record #:
31732
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Abstract:
Farmers in the rugged Appalachian terrain of western North Carolina are expanding their agriculture to grow ornamental shrubbery and Christmas trees as alternatives to their usual farm crops. This article discusses the history of agriculture in this area, the economic challenges farmers face, and the new types of agriculture they are producing.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 6, June 1972, p6-9, il, por Periodical Website