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7 results for Fishing--Hatteras
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Record #:
22579
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early twentieth century, William F. Nye Company of New Bedford, Massachusetts operated a bottlenose dolphin fishery on Hatteras Island, North Carolina. Nye specialized in the procurement and refinement of oils from dolphins and small whales as the main source for watch and clock oils. The fishery on Hatteras Island figured integrally into the maritime whaling industry, the ascendancy of clockmaking the United States, and the exploitation of southern fishing grounds by northern companies.
Record #:
1054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ernal Foster is a pioneer of offshore sportfishing at Hatteras.
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Full Text:
Record #:
29974
Author(s):
Abstract:
After moving to Hatteras, North Carolina, Mike Perrotty has found that red drum fishing on the Outer Banks is the best sense of thrill and accomplishment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p26-29, por
Record #:
29925
Author(s):
Abstract:
Formed in 1957, the Cape Hatteras Anglers Club originally had 16 members. Now over 350 people receive monthly information and participate in invitational tournaments every spring.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p20-23, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29924
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beach fishing on Hatteras Island has been a long tradition. Early in the morning, men shove off the beach with motor-powered dorys and use bunt nets to pocket up fish.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p17-19, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
24527
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recounts his experiences fishing off the coast in North Carolina as a child. The most popular areas included Morehead City, Hatteras, and the Wilmington area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 4, September 1977, p29-31, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35955
Author(s):
Abstract:
The harvest of the sea one could see in fish captured in nets, also captured on film by the Sea Chest’s staff. It was possible because of the area’s boats, six of which were also featured in film.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p65-69