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12 results for Christmas--Observances
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Record #:
34845
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Christmas punch has a way of lightening the mood and starting the evening right. Author Jill McCorkle discusses her own family’s traditional punch and how it changed through time.
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Record #:
34842
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Outside Charlotte, a Venezuelan family introduces their Christmas traditions to the community. Latin American Christmas celebrations last weeks from December into January and are highlighted by different foods made from scratch by families working together.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p164-168, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31677
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Lacy S. Vernon and his family in Mt. Airy are members of the Grace Moravian Church. In this article, Vernon describes the Moravian Christmas traditions and Yuletide celebrations, which include the Love feast and Candlelight Service.
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Record #:
22824
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Christmas in the 1890s was very different than it is today. While eating oysters and turkey for Christmas dinner, people enjoyed various social activities with firecrackers blasting along with the fun.
Record #:
34841
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Many Greek emigrants have come to North Carolina seeking a better life. Forsyth County has a thriving Greek-American population, and with this, many Greek Christmas traditions are passed on to the next generation.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p156-162, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34843
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The Reynolda House in Winston-Salem was once the home of R.J. and Katharine Reynolds, business owners and philanthropists. For the six years that Katharine was alive and in the house, Christmas was a spectacular, yet private event. Archived mementos and notes give a look into what the meals were like on this festive holiday.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p170-175, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16262
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Davidson County is witness to the survival of holiday rituals from a dark Germanic past into the 20th-century involving Easter and Christmas holidays with visits from Belsnickel and the building of the Easter nest.
Record #:
16404
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The 20th-century has been beset by a swift change in social and material customs, though some people of eastern North Carolina continue to remember the old ways. Perhaps one of the unique tributes paid to custom is several observances of Old Christmas. While the celebration of Old Christmas at Rodanthe has become widely known, people in Hertford and Martin counties also still observe the \"original and genuine\" Christmas.
Record #:
31377
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Old Salem is a historic area of Winston-Salem founded by a group of Moravians in 1776. The founding Moravians and those that followed gave a distinctive flavor to their town, leaving a legacy rich in traditions, especially those associated with Christmas. Some of the Moravian Yuletide traditions include thin ginger cookies, handmade beeswax candles, and lovefeasts.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 12, Dec 1984, p12-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
19010
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This article details the changes in Christmas traditions in North Carolina from the colonial period to the Civil War.
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The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p4-5, f
Record #:
32908
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A variety of unique Christmas customs are observed and closely tied to regions of North Carolina. In historic areas, such as Halifax and New Bern’s Tryon Palace, special events and tours reflect 18th-century traditions. In places such as Old Salem, decorations and ceremonies reflect the influence of the Moravians.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 39 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p18-19, il, por
Record #:
31468
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Thousands of families across western North Carolina will remember the white Christmas of 1981 as something of a Yuletide nightmare. The severe Christmas Eve storm that covered the region in snow also piled heavy loads of ice on power lines, forcing an estimated twenty-thousand families to celebrate without electricity. Several citizens describe how they dealt with the storm and celebrated Christmas without electricity.
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