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4 results for Moravians--Social life and customs
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Record #:
14630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lovefeasts are a Moravian tradition involving community gatherings on Christmas Eve to celebrate the birth of Christ. Simplicity and community are the hallmarks of lovefeasts, often observed with simple food and song. It is believed the first recorded lovefeast was on August 13, 1727 in Saxony. Though Christmas is a larger celebration, smaller more intimate lovefeasts take place to observe more personal events like birthdays and funerals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 30, Dec 1946, p3, 19, il
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Record #:
19692
Author(s):
Abstract:
Moravian director Count Zinzendorf envisioned a colony \"on a large tract of land on which the Moravians might live undisturbed, having the liberty of excluding all strangers from their settlements.\" This idea of a colony was distinct from other Piedmont settlers like the Scotch-Irish and Germans whom chose to settle on independent and isolated farms. From this colony a number of distinct social and religious behaviors evolved and are reviewed in this article.
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Record #:
31677
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lacy S. Vernon and his family in Mt. Airy are members of the Grace Moravian Church. In this article, Vernon describes the Moravian Christmas traditions and Yuletide celebrations, which include the Love feast and Candlelight Service.
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Record #:
32908
Author(s):
Abstract:
A variety of unique Christmas customs are observed and closely tied to regions of North Carolina. In historic areas, such as Halifax and New Bern’s Tryon Palace, special events and tours reflect 18th-century traditions. In places such as Old Salem, decorations and ceremonies reflect the influence of the Moravians.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 39 Issue 12, Dec 1981, p18-19, il, por