NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


21 results for Ceramics--Prehistoric
Currently viewing results 16 - 21
Previous
PAGE OF 2
Record #:
35406
Abstract:
This article is a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Riggs and Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35417
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35407
Author(s):
Abstract:
This was M.R. Harrington’s account of the discovery of Iroquois pottery surviving among the Eastern Cherokee, uncovered during his 1908-1909 expedition. Focused upon were the three principle forms of pottery characteristic of the Eastern Cherokee. Also discussed were three Eastern Cherokee women playing an active role in keeping the tradition alive, its production process, and similarities between Eastern Cherokee and New York Iroquois pottery.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35113
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
37642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
Source: