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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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25 results for "Insurance, Health"
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Record #:
36274
Abstract:
Medical advancements possible over the next decade included cryopreservation, controlling prosthetic limbs with the mind, and nanotechnology. Areas projected for improvement or further development over the next ten years included gene therapy, noninvasive technology, and cure of Dementia diseases. As for an area the author acknowledges is not clear, it involves medical ethics: when to cease providing procedures, especially where age is concerned.
Record #:
27740
Abstract:
A look at those uninsured in North Carolina as the state legislature considers their decision to deny health coverage to North Carolinians. A number of graphs with data from the 2012 census survey show who is uninsured in North Carolina. Latinos, part-time workers, and the under-educated are most at risk at not being covered under current conditions.
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Record #:
27752
Author(s):
Abstract:
The teens that make up Wake County’s Youth Empowered Solutions team are lobbying for school health centers in Wake County Schools. The county currently has over 27,000 uninsured teens. The centers would serve as a doctor’s office on school grounds for those students are low-income or uninsured. These centers do not currently exist in Wake County, but YES’s efforts to change this have earned them a Citizen Award form IndyWeek.
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Record #:
27863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people with eating disorders are exhausting their savings for treatment and some are dying from a lack of insurance coverage. Insurers often do not cover treatment for eating disorders. Area resident Amy Lambert details her struggle with the disorder and its financial burden. Chase Bannister who directs the Carolina House in Durham explains what his treatment facility does to help and Tori Toles of UNC’s Eating Disorder Program also discusses the problems for those wanting treatment.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 8, February 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
3937
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Abstract:
Rising costs of HMOs make it difficult for a number of small businesses to offer health insurance plans to their employees. Options in dealing with rising costs include joining an alliance, such as Caroliance, and working with a benefits consultant to get the best deal possible.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p12,14,18,20, il
Record #:
3206
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many small businesses are unable to offer employees health insurance. Caroliance, a health insurance purchasing co-op, originated by the state in 1991, meets this need by linking businesses with insurance carriers.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 2, Feb 1997, p12-13, 16-19, il
Record #:
2729
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employers having difficulty deciding on a health care plan will have even more choices in the years ahead, as the state is glutted with managed care companies. In 1996, 22 are in operation, with 14 others planning entry applications.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p32-35, il
Record #:
2392
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Abstract:
With the cost of health care on the rise, many large and small companies in the state are focusing on wellness and prevention programs. This approach not only helps keep health costs down, but also increases worker productivity.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 1995, p22-24,26,28,30-31, il
Record #:
2622
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Abstract:
The takeover by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina of Durham-based Caring Program for Children concerns health-care advocates who fear loss of financial support for its program to insure children of middle-class families.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 48, Nov 1995, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1428
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Abstract:
By 1995, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are projected to account for 75% of the health care market. In response to this trend, pharmaceutical firms are adjusting their business and marketing practices.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p52-57,59, il
Record #:
1480
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Abstract:
Local governments would face an increase in the number of employees and dependents for which they would be required to pay premiums under the Clinton Health Security Plan.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p1,8-10, il
Record #:
1478
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Abstract:
The State Health Plan Purchasing Alliance (SHPPA) applies the old idea of the food co-op to health insurance. By banding together, small businesses (in this case, two to forty-nine employees) hope to save money on health insurance.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Mar 1994, p32-34, il
Record #:
1586
Abstract:
The North Carolina League of Municipalities created the Risk Management Services (RMS) program as a health care option for cities and towns. The program's success allowed it to roll back and/or maintain rates and to return $2 million to cities and towns
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 5, May 1994, p1,6, il
Record #:
965
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1993-1994 General Assembly is attempting to define its role in confronting several tough issues, including health insurance reform, the environment, and constitutional reform.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 2, Feb 1993, p18-19, por