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10 results for Health maintenance organizations
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Record #:
276
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health Maintenance Organizations are entering North Carolina at a record rate, which creates a need for new policy governing health care in the state.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, Feb 1985, p58-69, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
572
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employers are pressing insurers for innovations, and the responses are leading companies to conclude that Health Maintenance Organizations are the best option.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 6, June 1991, p46-53, il
Record #:
845
Author(s):
Abstract:
A group of Tar Heel doctors led by Bob Greczyn formed Carolina Physicians' Health Plan, an health maintenance organization owned by physicians.
Source:
Record #:
1428
Author(s):
Abstract:
By 1995, health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are projected to account for 75% of the health care market. In response to this trend, pharmaceutical firms are adjusting their business and marketing practices.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p52-57,59, il
Record #:
2137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Competition among hospitals is helping to moderate rising health-care costs in the state. Shorter hospital stays, alliances with nursing homes, and purchase of physician practices by hospitals are contributing to this trend.
Record #:
2178
Abstract:
Founded in 1985, Carolina Physicians' Health Plan (CPHP), a health maintenance organization (HMO), almost floundered. With new CEO Bob Greczyn at the helm, Healthsource, Inc., which purchased CPHP, now ranks second among the state's HMOs.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 2, Feb 1995, p19-20, il
Record #:
2729
Author(s):
Abstract:
Employers having difficulty deciding on a health care plan will have even more choices in the years ahead, as the state is glutted with managed care companies. In 1996, 22 are in operation, with 14 others planning entry applications.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p32-35, il
Record #:
3937
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising costs of HMOs make it difficult for a number of small businesses to offer health insurance plans to their employees. Options in dealing with rising costs include joining an alliance, such as Caroliance, and working with a benefits consultant to get the best deal possible.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p12,14,18,20, il
Record #:
5117
Author(s):
Abstract:
Managed care in North Carolina is evolving into two levels of service - rural and urban. In urban counties having employer-paid plans and multiple hospitals, HMO membership is highest. In rural counties, like Gates and Tyrrell, membership is insignificant. Counties are ranked by the number of physicians per 10,000 population served. Orange County ranks first with 86.4 physicians per 10,000 and Pitt third with 40.7. Twenty-five counties have 6.5 physicians or fewer per 10,000.
Record #:
4354
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year Americans spend over $27 million of their own money on nontraditional medical treatments, including acupuncture, homeopathy, and chiropractic therapies. This trend has not been lost on health insurers. Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina was the first insurer in the state to develop a plan called Alt Med Blue. Several other state HMOs have since added an alt med component to their programs.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Nov 1999, p12, 15-16, 20, 22, il