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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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43 results for "Electric utilities"
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Record #:
13081
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Although it will have a particular impact on business and industry, the ability of North Carolina's electric utilities to supply adequate power to everyone in the state could be in jeopardy. One reason is that construction of new generating capacity has come to a near standstill. Shaw examines what this could mean in the decade ahead.
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Record #:
13532
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A well defined program of land utilization, and forestation and soil improvement is providing Duke Power Company with a profitable byproduct. Also, Duke provides adequate protection of its water resources for hydroelectric power production.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 43, Mar 1954, p6-7, f
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Record #:
28669
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More than 100 electric power providers serve nearly 10 million people in North Carolina. These include consumer-owned electric cooperatives, investor-owned utilities, city governments, university-owned utility, or other utilities. The history, service areas, regulations of the electric power providers in the state are described and a map provides the service areas in the state.
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Record #:
30470
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In the southeast, particularly North Carolina, there is an industrial spring with new plan, plants, and industries opening up all over the region. Tied to this is the development of the electric power industry, which are cooperating and growing with the state's industries.
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Record #:
30898
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New energy policy legislation requires electric cooperatives, by 2018, to have ten percent of their total electricity needs generated from renewable resources or displaced through effective energy efficiency programs. More renewable energy for North Carolina will need an upgraded transmission network to go where it will be needed.
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Record #:
30897
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The North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative identified seventeen major transmission projects as part of the 2007-2017 Collaborative Transmission Plan for North Carolina. The projects represent more than four-hundred million dollars in investments for improved electric utilities and transmission.
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Record #:
30985
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North Carolina’s electric utilities are including natural gas generation as a bigger part of resource plans, along with renewable energy and efficiency measures, in an effort to make up for delayed coal-fired and nuclear generation. This article discusses natural gas consumption in North Carolina, and bridging the gap between now and when advanced low-emissions power generation technologies become available in the future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
31044
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NC GreenPower was launched in 2003 to encourage the development of renewable energy resources in North Carolina through voluntary, tax-deductible contributions that individuals can make through their electric bills or directly to the program. The minimum contribution level is four-dollars per block of renewable energy generated and added to North Carolina’s power grid.
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Record #:
31152
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North Carolina hosts more military bases than any other state, including the Army’s Fort Bragg and the Air Force’s Pope Air Force Base. The electric system at the military bases is powered by Sandhills Utility Services, a utility company formed by four Touchstone Energy cooperatives. This article discusses how the electricity system was designed and developed, and the special electric requirements of military operations.
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Record #:
31201
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North Carolina energy interests are developing a means for consumers to assist in the development of renewable energy resources. If approved, the program called NC GreenPower would allow consumers individually and voluntarily to make an additional payment in their electricity bill to help utilities acquire renewable power. The program is designed to create a market and an incentive for companies to develop and sell green power.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31217
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As state governments consider electric industry changes nationwide, utilities gain opportunities to offer more serves to more customers. This article presents an interview with Chuck Terrillon how North Carolina electric cooperatives are preparing for a restructured electric utility industry. Terrillon is the CEO of the companies organized by North Carolina’s electric cooperatives.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31286
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North Carolina’s electric utilities show substantial progress in their Year 2000 (Y2K) readiness efforts, and most will be ready well in advance of the Y2K date rollover. Millennium-related date problems in most of the electric utility industry will be tested and fixed by June 30, 1999 to ensure that electric systems and computer programs remain on after January 1, 2000.
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Record #:
31368
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Hurricane Diana brought damaging winds and rains to several southeastern North Carolina counties in mid-September. Thousands of homes and businesses served by Electric Membership Corporations lost power for as long as five days. This article describes the impacts of the storm, and the efforts to repair and restore power.
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Record #:
31376
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For the first time, North Carolina state sales tax will be applied to the sales of electric, gas and intrastate telephone service. Beginning January 1, 1985, electric bills will include a calculation for three percent in state sales tax, which can be deducted from federal income taxes. The legislature’s intent was to carve the sales tax out of the six percent gross receipts tax that consumers were already paying.
Record #:
31418
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North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations have launched a new statewide effort to help state and local officials entice new industries into building plants within co-op service areas. This article explores how a major industry, dubbed the “Snowbird” plant, chose its site in Wake Forest and impacted the Wake County community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1983, p10-12, il, por Periodical Website