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15 results for Barick, Frank B
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Record #:
6597
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During 1950-51, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission's Big Game Restoration Program stocked 125 deer on three new wildlife refuges. Barick describes the areas which include Lake Lure Refuge, Hanging Rock State Park, and Little Grandfather Mountain Wildlife Management Area. Restocked areas are closed to hunting for a minimum of five years to allow the stock to multiply.
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Record #:
6621
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In recent years there has been a demand from North Carolina hunters for more big game in the state. In this article Barick discusses the three objectives of North Carolina's big game restoration program and the methods by which they will be accomplished. The objectives are to increase the supply of big game in the state, principally deer at the program's start; to create more refuges and public hunting grounds; and to develop more efficient big game management techniques.
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Record #:
8200
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The recently concluded management area deer season was the second best in all the years since these hunts have been conducted. Recordkeeping began in 1948. The 1966 season deer kill was 2,517 and was exceeded only in 1963 when 2,747 deer were taken. Wildlife management areas include Pisgah, Mt. Mitchell, Sandhills, and Croatan. Bucks with guns, either sex, and bow and arrow are the three types of hunts on which statistics are gathered.
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Record #:
8321
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This year's hunt report compares the various types of hunts provided on games lands with checking stations from 1948 to 1967. These lands were established primarily for big game restoration, and most of the hunting is for big game. Small game hunts are provided as they can be fitted into the hunt calendar. Statistics are provided on the following types of hunts: bear-boar hunts, bear hunts, deer-bear dog hunts, buck deer gun still hunts, either sex deer hunts, archery hunts, wild turkey hunts, raccoon and opossum hunts, small games hunts, and waterfowl hunts.
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Record #:
8376
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Bobcats are the third most important predator of deer after man and dogs. Predation by other animals is slight, with panthers active only in Florida and bears and foxes rarely attacking deer in North Carolina. Miscellaneous deer mortality included running into cars and trains, getting tangled in fences, and dying from tick bites. Predators take an average of 8.5 percent from deer herds each year; miscellaneous mortalities account for 6.3 percent; and hunting accounts for 85 percent, but only 63 percent is considered legal harvest. The other 22 percent is taken illegally or is killed but lost in the woods.
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Record #:
8379
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has initiated an in-depth study to determine why the state's black bear population is declining. In 1969, it was estimated that the statewide bear population was between 2,000 and 3,000, or about a fourth of the number 20 years ago. The study seeks to determine the distribution and abundance of black bears in North Carolina; the impact of changing land use on the bear's habitat; the effect of hunting on bear populations; and biological characteristics of the species that influence its survivability in the 20th-century.
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Record #:
8368
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This study seeks to identify the principal predators of deer in the southeastern United States and to determine their impact on deer herds and deer management. Other forms of deer mortality are also included. Barick discusses the study procedure, the size of the wildlife areas studied, how the data was analyzed, and how predation by dogs was measured. Data for dog predation was collected from western North Carolina wildlife management areas.
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Record #:
9015
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During the 1971-72 hunting season, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission initiated a new expanded game lands program. Barick evaluates the successes and failures in the western, central, and eastern game lands over the past two years.
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Record #:
9461
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The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has invited biologists with expertise on various endangered species to submit study proposals aimed at determining the status and distribution of such species in North Carolina. The particular species are the red-cockaded woodpecker, American alligator, brown pelican, peregrine falcon, bald eagle, eastern cougar, Indiana and gray bats, and the Florida manatee.
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Record #:
9465
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Barick discusses how a species can be designated as endangered and once on the list what can be done to ensure its survival. Currently there are 170 animal species in the country designated as endangered, and fifteen of them are listed as occurring in North Carolina.
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Record #:
38760
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A more efficient way to trap deer for relocation was implemented based on weather patterns.
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Record #:
38787
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The age of a deer that was caught via hunting can be determined and applied to management strategies.
Record #:
6798
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According to reports from hunters who completed the game kill survey for 1964-1965, several game species harvests topped all previous records. For example, the state deer kill was computed at 39,792, up by 11,000 from 1962. Statistics are reported from the nine wildlife districts and a total for the state given. Statistics include number of hunters, number of hunting trips, number of kills, and number of kills per trip. Animals hunted include bear, deer, squirrels, rabbit, quail, and dove.
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Record #:
8380
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Small game hunting is big business. Nationally in 1965, almost eleven million persons, aged twelve years and older, hunted small game. Over $600 million was spent, and hunters traveled four billion automobile miles on approximately 128 million hunting trips. In North Carolina there are over 400,000 licensed hunters, most of whom hunt small game. In interviews conducted with 553 small game hunters, the following characteristics were revealed: The hunter is male; married; a state resident; lives in a rural area within fifty miles of the wildlife management area where he hunts; is about forty years old; and has graduated from high school.
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Record #:
8384
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The success of the small game hunter is often determined by the access available. Forest roads and trails are important to game management programs and to hunting. The authors interviewed 553 small game hunters during the early-opening and late-opening seasons as they left the management areas after a day's hunt. Hunters were asked to describe how they used the roads and trails while hunting and to trace the route they had walked on a small-scale map of the hunting area. Responses were used to determine how access roads were used; how the hunters distributed themselves in the hunting area; what the game distribution was; and how far hunters penetrated into the woods from the access roads.
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