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10 results for Small game hunting
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Record #:
21181
Author(s):
Abstract:
In June 2013, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission presented staff members of the Land Trust for Central North Carolina with the 2013 Excellence in Wildlife Management, Lawrence G. Diedrick Small Game Award. The award recognizes organization and individuals for the promotion of habitat management for small game species.
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Record #:
26354
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N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission reports that the 1978-79 field season should be good. With good weather and increased efforts for habitat conservation, small game such as squirrel and rabbits have had good reproductive and survival seasons.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 4, Fall 1978, p5
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Record #:
26419
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quail, squirrel, and rabbit populations are having a banner year, and small game hunters in North Carolina stand to take advantage of the increasing populations across the state.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 1, Jan 1980, p5
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Record #:
26580
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Abstract:
Changes to game laws in North Carolina will no longer required hunters to use plugged shotguns for hunting small game, except for migratory birds.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p12
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Record #:
26675
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Abstract:
Research and management of rabbits and quail, two of North Carolina’s most popular small game species, will be emphasized more in the near future. Due to population declines, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission will work with landowners to improve habitat for small game and resolve conflicts with hunters who trespass.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1985, p6
Record #:
8321
Author(s):
Abstract:
This year's hunt report compares the various types of hunts provided on games lands with checking stations from 1948 to 1967. These lands were established primarily for big game restoration, and most of the hunting is for big game. Small game hunts are provided as they can be fitted into the hunt calendar. Statistics are provided on the following types of hunts: bear-boar hunts, bear hunts, deer-bear dog hunts, buck deer gun still hunts, either sex deer hunts, archery hunts, wild turkey hunts, raccoon and opossum hunts, small games hunts, and waterfowl hunts.
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Record #:
8380
Abstract:
Small game hunting is big business. Nationally in 1965, almost eleven million persons, aged twelve years and older, hunted small game. Over $600 million was spent, and hunters traveled four billion automobile miles on approximately 128 million hunting trips. In North Carolina there are over 400,000 licensed hunters, most of whom hunt small game. In interviews conducted with 553 small game hunters, the following characteristics were revealed: The hunter is male; married; a state resident; lives in a rural area within fifty miles of the wildlife management area where he hunts; is about forty years old; and has graduated from high school.
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Record #:
8384
Abstract:
The success of the small game hunter is often determined by the access available. Forest roads and trails are important to game management programs and to hunting. The authors interviewed 553 small game hunters during the early-opening and late-opening seasons as they left the management areas after a day's hunt. Hunters were asked to describe how they used the roads and trails while hunting and to trace the route they had walked on a small-scale map of the hunting area. Responses were used to determine how access roads were used; how the hunters distributed themselves in the hunting area; what the game distribution was; and how far hunters penetrated into the woods from the access roads.
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Record #:
9046
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Abstract:
A mail survey of hunters was conducted at the close of the 1972-73 hunting season to determine the number of hunters and their successes. Data includes hunting license sales, money spent by hunters during the season, games species hunted, and hunter participation by wildlife districts.
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Record #:
26951
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Abstract:
Hunting seasons for fox squirrels and grouse are open in North Carolina. The grouse season runs through February 28 and the squirrel season runs thought January 31. Grouse are found only in western North Carolina, near old fields, abandoned homesteads and wild apple trees.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Nov/Dec 1982, p3, por
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