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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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47 results for "Lacour, Greg"
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Record #:
27826
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Artist Dan Nance paints historical renderings of events in the Charlotte area and has been doing so for twenty years. His collection has been reunited for the first time at the Charlotte Museum of History for an exhibit titled: “Charlotte’s Road to Revolution: Paintings by North Carolina Artist Dan Nance.”
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p138-142,144, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
34425
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Mayor Vi Lyles swept into office last year with a resounding win over her Republican opponent, Charlotte City Council member Kenny Smith, and a mandate for change that also transformed the makeup of the eleven-member council. Lyles is the city’s first black female mayor and is committed to addressing affordable housing, policing, employment, and other civic issues.
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38176
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What the author called “the silver tsunami” is increasingly evident in town and metros alike, from factors such as baby boomers entering retirement. Addressing elderly-specific issues is church programs focusing on topics like dementia. Helping to improve the quality of life for impoverished elders is government programs such as Centralina Area Agency on Aging, which helps with needs like transportation. Along with church and government programs there is the Meck 60+ project, a needs assessment study calibrating the number of elderly individuals and the extent of issues and needs related to aging.
Record #:
27293
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The Belmont neighborhood in Charlotte was once a violent area. Now, the area is experiencing redevelopment, although many longtime residents see this as an issue since the value of these new homes have skyrocketed.
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Record #:
41192
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Lacour applies the term wedge to the struggles the poor in Mecklenburg County face in finding adequate housing. Related to price and safety are factors such as the widening gap between the rich and poor in cities such as Pineville and Charlotte and dearth of economic mobility for minorities, particularly in Charlotte.
Record #:
34433
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The Charlotte Regional Partnership has branded itself as “Charlotte USA.” The partnership’s intent is to connect companies and their job opportunities to the workforces in towns with their own distinct economies but still within the Charlotte area. While the partnership says it successfully bid and recruited twelve economic development projects in 2017, some officials wonder if the partnership is as effective as it could be, especially in light of a high-profile failure in January.
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Record #:
27633
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Chantilly is a small, suburban-like neighborhood between Plaza Midwood and Elizabeth in Uptown Charlotte. Many Charlotteans do not even know the neighborhood exists, but those who live there want to stay due to its seclusion, older homes, and quiet streets.
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Record #:
20408
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Under the direction of Foundation for the Carolinas, the Charlotte area's preeminent philanthropic organization, large-scale civic issues such as historic preservation are starting to get the attention they deserve.
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Record #:
39490
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Helping the city to close its fiscal gap toward the construction of Freedom Apartments is Covenant Presbyterian Church. Its low interest loan, a form of financial assistance rarely adopted by the area’s churches, is a continuation of efforts to alleviate housing insecurity. Other endeavors enacted since Covenant’s founding in 1951 include its aid to blacks displaced by urban renewal in the 1960s to co-founding the Jeremiah Project in the 1980s.
Record #:
22069
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Historic-preservation income-tax credit from the federal government in 1976 and one from the state in 1998 have helped to renovate historic buildings and bring new life to dying down-towns. In the past thirty years these credits have helped finance 1,324 projects that have generated an estimated $1.4 billion in economic output. However, a 2013 overhaul of the tax code by the Republican-controlled NC General Assembly will end the state credit program at the end of 2014. Tax credits for commercial, residential, and mill buildings will be eliminated unless renewed. At present there are no plans to revisit tax reform during the short session.
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Record #:
24926
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After firing the longtime County Manager Harry Jones, the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners is dragging their feet in finding a new one. Some say due to a lack of experience in finding such candidates, others are saying a lack of planning was involved.
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Record #:
36959
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A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
24942
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There is growing concern that the integrity of the Coulwood area of Charlotte will be lost if it is allowed to be developed. Its vast difference from the more urban portions of Charlotte is what makes it unique.
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Record #:
31443
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Policy experts explain how they would address four of the main factors that contribute to Charlotte’s lack of economic mobility, and one major philanthropist talks about how to give back.
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