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7 results for North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine Vol. 10 Issue 5, October/November 2018
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Record #:
38126
Author(s):
Abstract:
This trail includes ten churches representing Baptist, Episcopal, and Christian Churches, with nine of the churches on the National Register of Historic Places. In towns such as Bear Grass, Hamilton, Robersonville, Everetts, Jamesville, Williamston, and Oak City, they include St. Martin’s Episcopal, Skewarkey Primitive Baptist Church, and Oak City Christian Church.
Record #:
38125
Abstract:
Since the late 19th century, this lake has provided hunting grounds for game birds such as geese, ducks, and swans. It has also provided opportunities for hunting guides, the well-known including John Harold Swindell and Percy Carawan. The hunting continues, albeit without guides, and game birds are in abundance, protected by the Wildlife Commission regulations.
Record #:
38128
Abstract:
The mystery around the Chowan River was two-fold: Lost Colonists of Roanoke Island; Dorothie, whose remains are believed discovered in Bennett’s Creek. Both parts of the mystery are examined in Don Upchurch’s In Pursuit of Dorothie, the Lost Colony Ship. Part investigation, part speculation, it explores a three-fold explanation for the two-fold mystery. The Dorothie transported the Colonists out of Roanoke, which means they survived beyond 1590, thus offering Croatan a meaning not related to death, but a new life.
Record #:
38130
Author(s):
Abstract:
This avian sanctuary offers more than shelter for a myriad of water and land fowl. For North Carolina and Virginia’s public school students, it has become a popular field trip destination. On a higher education note, East Carolina University and Sylvan Heights are collaborating in endangered species conservation and research opportunities. Individuals of all ages can partake in its other educational endeavors: festivals, guided tours, conservation and research talks, field sketching workshops, and birding trips.
Record #:
38129
Author(s):
Abstract:
Early Station’s depot closing can be easily explained: Atlantic Coast’s ceasing operation meant the closure of a station once providing passage to towns like Ahoskie and Norfolk three times a day. The more recent spelling of the town’s name as Earleys can be explained as an error; it was named for the Early family. As for the light seen around the abandoned depot, it has yielded no explanation and much speculation. Speculations for this phenomenon: stories always involving a man’s decapitation and everlasting search by the man’s spirit for his head.
Record #:
38127
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hyde County house built in 1857 continues to draw attention for reasons that go beyond its unique architectural design. Thus far, two restoration phases are complete: a matching grant from the Covington Foundation yielded a repaired roof; phase two involved raising the house to make room for brick piers. As for phase three, fundraising and expert advice from the State Preservation Office is part of the plan for repairs on outside surfaces and the first floor fireplaces.
Record #:
38131
Author(s):
Abstract:
Enfield, population about 1,000 in the early twentieth century, had two larger than life distinctions: early adopter among North Carolina’s towns of crop rotation; world’s top producer of raw peanuts. Even if it no longer can offer the latter boast, the author proclaims Enfield can still tout its peanuts as the tastiest in the world in events like its Cotton and Peanut Festival.