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9 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 6 Issue 2, Dec 1958
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Record #:
16506
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Abstract:
Dramatic and colorful days of the century-old Neuse River lighthouse, which became a part of the legendary coastal past with its dismantling over thirty years ago, live again most vividly as they are recalled by the 76-year old lightkeeper, Captain Thomas Daniels Quidley, who lived with it during the last twenty-five years of its history.
Record #:
16507
Author(s):
Abstract:
Home remedies were by force a necessity in both dental and medical cases, and as likely to cure as not. Practically all homes were supplied with ingredients for home remedies. For example, pine tar could kill a tooth ache, horehound could be boiled as a syrup for colds, and nutmeg could ease an upset stomach.
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Record #:
16508
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Abstract:
It has been said that Scotsmen are more ardent Scots the farther away they are from Scotland. This may indeed be true. It's certainly apparent when you watch the crowds which annually attend Linville's colorful Highland Games and Gathering of the Clans.
Record #:
35158
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Abstract:
Tall tales about some interesting men and women who lived in the Appalachian Mountains. Most were exaggerated stories about weird quirks, feats of strength, hunting, and religious fanatics.
Record #:
35161
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Abstract:
Illiterate herself, Margaret Rendleman had a man transcribe her will, who spelled the words as he heard and pronounced them.
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Record #:
35160
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A song inspired by the true event of a woman, Lottie Yates, getting murdered by her husband in Kentucky, 1895. Complete with the lyrics and sheet music.
Record #:
35159
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Abstract:
Several pages of sayings, organized alphabetically by the subject matter.
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Record #:
35162
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A story about a girl who was driven into town by a neighbor to go see a witch to tell her what to do about an angry woman.
Record #:
35163
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1841, it appeared to rain blood, which was later found out to be part of a large amount of butterflies shedding their pupa. However, this did not stop more extreme explanations from coming forth.
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