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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 58 Issue 2, Fall/Winter 2011
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Record #:
18951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr. is an apple historian and retired orchardist who lives in Pittsboro. Gathered from the farmyards of North Carolina and other southern states, Calhoun has a nursery of heirloom apples growing on his property and has written the definitive book on the history of the fruit in the south.
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Record #:
18952
Author(s):
Abstract:
Videographer Neal Hutcheson has produced an extensive collection of documentaries on North Carolina's notable folk artists, folk speech of North Carolina cultural groups, and the family and community contexts of regional folk life.
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Record #:
18953
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Abstract:
No one, including historians, is quite sure when and how North Carolina became dubbed the Tar Heel State, but Bishop elaborates on the legend in terms of the production of tar and turpentine in the state and traces the history of that production through time.
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Record #:
36848
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Charles Heatherly became a beekeeper when his source for his favorite type of honey was no longer available. In this interview, he explains the workings of bee culture, and how to harvest honey and cultivate their natural resources. “Stella Daniel’s Orange Carrot Cake” recipe is included at the end of the article.
Record #:
36845
Abstract:
The Cockman family performed gospel hymns for nearly 25 years; the traveled from Florida to New York performing for churches, festivals, weddings, funerals, and more. The family group also teaches others to play music and sing and have recorded their own albums.
Record #:
36843
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Abstract:
Inspired by the banjo-playing of his mother, Ward developed a two-finger banjo picking in his own style, creating his own unique sound.
Record #:
36841
Abstract:
David Lee began playing music and creating song lyrics when he was a teenager, which led to his launching of his own record company and his own music. Over the years, his career in music represented an important contribution to folklife, especially vernacular music and occupational folklife in North Carolina and the Southeast.