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11 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 18 Issue 3, Nov 1970
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Record #:
16448
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Abstract:
Much of the folklore in North Carolina has its roots in British and European folklore, brought over by the original settlers. This article deals with material collected from Mrs. Bridget Van Steen, an Irishwoman now living in Winston-Salem. Mrs. Van Steen was born and raised in County May and takes great interest in the folklore of Ireland.
Record #:
16449
Author(s):
Abstract:
African American folk speech in the South possesses certain features which are in contrast with African American speech in other geographical areas of the country as well as with general and highland Southern dialects of whites. From a linguistic point of view this may be attributable to various reasons such as a language not usually seen in print.
Record #:
16447
Abstract:
On June 30, 1906, a federal law, the Food and Drug Act of 1906 or the Wiley Act, was enacted for preventing the misbranding of food, drugs, medicines, and liquors. Booker and Booker discuss the heyday of patent medicines before the advent of the Wiley Act, including their uses, ingredients, and advertising.
Record #:
35374
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Abstract:
As people settled across America, they brought their superstitions and beliefs with them; the list is composed of 145 beliefs that were found in California but originated from North Carolina.
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Record #:
35373
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When Governor Scott moved into the Governor’s mansion, the bed from the first governors stay was still in the master bedroom, and when it was removed, a strange knocking on the walls began.
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Record #:
35375
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Written in the same dialect of the setting, this is a story of how a young couple ended up together.
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Record #:
35379
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A tale about a patient buzzard and an impatient hawk is the basis for the author’s analysis of story variations. It is a companion article to one published in the previous issue, titled “The Fox and the Goose.”
Record #:
35380
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When the weather turned cold enough, the annual hog killing would start, which was a full day’s work for the slaves.
Record #:
35377
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A poem from a woman who lived on a Native American reservation.
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Record #:
35378
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The author has pulled an excerpt from a book published in 1572 as an example of the feelings that come with the belief that one is about to die.
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