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5 results for Journal of the New Bern Historical Society Vol. 2 Issue 2, Nov 1989
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Record #:
3216
Abstract:
Since 1769, when two-thirds of the town was destroyed, New Bern has been visited by hurricanes, including one in 1815 that brought ten feet of water and one in 1913 that destroyed the Neuse River Bridge. Ione in 1955 brought winds of 100 mph.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
36133
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern, with maritime roots, became known as a major shipping port by the mid-eighteenth century. This helped to establish its place in the triangular trade and as the most populous town by the Revolution period. The War of 1812 and Civil War negatively impacted the trade-built economy. In fact, recovery by the 1870s occurred through growth in another industry: lumbering. Concerning its more current economy, industries contributing to its fiscal health since the nineteenth century were also transportation based: railroads and trucking.
Record #:
36134
Author(s):
Abstract:
All Saints Chapel, built in the late 1890s and constructed in the Carpenter Gothic Style, was larger than its exterior suggested. As for other aspects of its appearance, longtime residents recall the exterior as painted white, but research by the author asserted otherwise. In fact, the recent repainting has returned the church to its original color, as well as the color scheme popular during the period in which the church was built.
Record #:
36135
Author(s):
Abstract:
This former soldier’s letters bear a close resemblance of the truth about life in combat. Expected details included troop movements and the Union army’s advantages. The unexpected was his surprise that the war continued, given the rules implemented by the times: short term enlistments, officers’ elections by their troops, and recruitment provisions such as apples and cigars.
Record #:
36132
Author(s):
Abstract:
Miss Mary was Mary Taylor Oliver, with whom the author lived in the 1920s. She proved herself impressionable through a close friendship with the author’s father; operating her father’s insurance agency; and characteristics such as integrity.