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5 results for Friend O’ Wildlife Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974
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Record #:
25948
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary findings have discovered that organic water pollution is creating the conditions for disease among game fish in North Carolina’s fishing lakes. The disease, which has been found to be present in all southeastern states, produces sores lesions on the fish skin, scales, and mouths. Pollution from sewage, industrial waste, and runoff produce the conditions which favor the condition to be spread among populations; however, at the time there is no particular solution except to limit pollution into the river and lake systems.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p6
Record #:
25947
Author(s):
Abstract:
Secretary of the Department of Natural and Economic Resources (NER), James E. Harrington, Jr., laid to rest rumors that the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission faces major changes as it is reorganized into NER. The NCWRC will retain its autonomy while also gaining the added financial resources of the NER.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p3
Record #:
25949
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent project has appraised the value of fish and wildlife in the southeastern United States to be worth approximately $24 billion a year.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p7
Record #:
25946
Author(s):
Abstract:
State wildlife agencies are being consolidated into resources within other departments across the country. Although there has been some improvement in the process between complaints and action, some argue the moves are putting wildlife behind air and water in terms of importance.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p3
Subject(s):
Record #:
25950
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is a widespread notion that wildlife in North Carolina is rapidly disappearing. But 23 years of protection, management, and research have kept many species abundant in the state thanks to the efforts of state and federal programs and hunters and fishers themselves.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p14