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2432 results for "Our State"
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Record #:
41286
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Roosevelt dime bears initials visible when magnified. Interviews with Selma Burke also provided a kind of magnification for this coin: its true story. Her sculpture of Roosevelt was the model for the image of the president presented. Happening long before the Civil Rights movement, Roosevelt’s selection of Burke is prescient. Even if a unanimous acknowledgment of Burke as the creator does not happen, she is an inspiration for African Americans.
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Record #:
41284
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It was a dynamic decade, due to social and cultural forces encouraging progress and protest. The author observed that progress and protest were particularly manifest in higher education, government, sports, and entertainment.
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Record #:
41285
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The family trees the author speaks do not bear the names of ancestors. Found on family lands, though, homestead trees can testify to the presence of generations past.
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Record #:
41318
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Mountain or coast scape, urban or rural setting, landmark present or prospective, this gallery of paintings selected by the Our State staff can appeal to the heart as well as the intellect.
Record #:
41322
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Abstract:
A group of physicians purchased a building whose architectural history makes it a landmark. From features such as the reconstructed hardwood floors, their restaurant still reflects Mount Pleasant Mercantile General Store’s community spirit.
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Record #:
41326
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Once housing Highland Park Gingham Mills, Optimist Hall continues to convey a landmark-level spirit as a restaurant. The Dumpling Lady’s renovated interior and exterior reflects its mill past, as well as a future for this urban renewal trend.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 9, February 2020, p122-124, 126, 128 Periodical Website
Record #:
41327
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blizzards in early 1960 left a part of North Carolina more than drifts up to ten feet. Fortunately, communities across the state moved to help were a boon to mountain towns immobilized by the weather winter anomaly.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 9, February 2020, p132-134, 136, 138-139 Periodical Website
Record #:
40414
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An area near Swansboro known as the Hammocks, as much as S.R. Simmons Camp, helped shape the character of generations of rural, black high school students. Recollections such as former camper and camp director Willie Randolph attest the enduring impact of what’s also described as a beach resort and community retreat.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p98-100, 102, 104, 106 Periodical Website
Record #:
40416
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two decades before Rachel Carson became a pioneer for the environmentalist movement, she laid the foundation for marine biologists through her work at a trio of islands south of Beaufort. In addition to the landmark Silent Spring is the perhaps lesser known first book, Under the Sea Wind, inspired by her experiences at Carrot, Town Marsh, and Bird Shoal.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p128-132, 134, 136 Periodical Website
Record #:
40417
Author(s):
Abstract:
McCorkle’s return to Holden Beach suggested much has changed in the fifty year old island town. In recalling landmarks such as the Surfside Pavilion, a rustic swing bridge, and VanWerry Grocery Store, she proved the town is also the same: in memory.
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Record #:
40415
Author(s):
Abstract:
A day in the life account reveals how native commercial fishermen help to incrementally increase the amount of local seafood sold in restaurants across North Carolina and keep the "sea to table" food trend viable.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p108-112, 114-115 Periodical Website
Record #:
40418
Author(s):
Abstract:
The nationally recognized Civil Rights Movement was represented locally by events such as the 1957 sit-in at Durham’s Royal Ice Cream Company, led by the Rev. Douglas Moore, and the 1960 Woolworth sit-in led by a quartet of AT&T students. Protests such as these planted seeds of justice that, decades later, is bearing fruit for both blacks and whites.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p168-170, 172, 174, 176 Periodical Website