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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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115 results for "New East"
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Record #:
6027
Abstract:
Modern outdoor drama began in Manteo with the first performance of The Lost Colony. In this NEW EAST interview playwright Paul Green reminisces about his most famous creation.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p18-21, por
Record #:
35484
Author(s):
Abstract:
History comes to life—of pirates, in particular—through a group of actors whose show became part of the state’s Bicentennial activities. These thespians—in real life, including a family of six—included in their reenactment of life on the high seas a ship, the Meka II. The ship that’s also their home was built by the man who may be called Captain, but is called Horatio Sinbad by his family, Ross Morphew.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p22-25, 46-48
Record #:
35483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Advice was dispensed by the author and her expert sources, including a professor from the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences. Examples of their tips were collection times, places (e.g. Shackleford Banks), care, and identification. To highlight their worth, commonly defined in souvenir status, the author noted other purposes, ranging from containers to decorations, from coinage to dye source.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p14-17, 59
Record #:
35482
Author(s):
Abstract:
A victim can be the Central America, a ship that an oceanographic atlas and US Navy wreck list had tried to locate. Victim can be defined by the loss of 482 human lives. In this case, victim directly alluded to the loss of gold. Approximately $600,000 of this precious metal—in the form of coins, dust, and nuggets—was jettisoned by the crew into the sand clouded briny deep.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p10-13, 45, 47
Record #:
35485
Author(s):
Abstract:
Story, in this case, crossed the line between fiction and non-fiction. the author noted that her grandmother Mary Casey was a “walking, talking, history book of the Outer Banks.” More history than story can be perceived in recollections that included references to Daniel Boone and the unsavory early days of Hyde County.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p30-33, 41
Record #:
35486
Author(s):
Abstract:
The destruction of the Outer Banks, according to the author, can be traced back to the realty development that started during the Great Depression. The destruction of the decades can be perceived in the erosion of the beach and pollution of water. Fortunately, the observation of this yield ended on a hopeful notes. The author concluded that, what human beings have done, can be undone with a combination of cooperative government programs and love for the land.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p34-37
Record #:
5968
Author(s):
Abstract:
Merchants Millpond, located in Gates County, is beautiful, unspoiled land that is soon to become a state park. The area is described by Sierra Club members from Greenville as having \"wild beauty, primeval stillness and grandeur, eerie bird calls, gnarled trees, and rippling reflections.\" Patterson discusses how the land was acquired and how the state will use it.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1976, p22-25, il
Record #:
5970
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jean Kell, who was doing research in the North Carolina State Archives, discovered a new and unknown chapter in the state's history. One year after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown and before the peace treaty was signed, the last battle of the Revolutionary War was fought at Beaufort in Carteret County in April 1782. Kell recounts the battle which ended just seven years, lacking a day, from the opening battle on April 18, 1775.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p10-14, il
Record #:
5969
Abstract:
On May 21, 1957, the North Carolina House passed Bill No. 305, which established \"The Old North State\" as the official state toast. Hedrick discusses the history of the toast - how it came to be written; the author, Mrs. Henry C. Martin; and Mrs. Mary Burke Kerr, the person who set it to music.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1976, p27-29, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
5978
Author(s):
Abstract:
Planter, soldier, and politician, General Robert Howe probably was the most dashing and most controversial Revolutionary War leader from North Carolina. Howe was a supporter of anti-British resistance from the very beginning.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p33-34, 55, por
Record #:
5977
Author(s):
Abstract:
On October 25, 1774, Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party, in order to tell the government in England what North Carolina women were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Griffin discusses the event, which was \"the earliest instance of political activity on the part of women in the American colonies.\"
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p24-27, il
Record #:
5975
Abstract:
Located on the marshy coast of North Carolina and Virginia, the Great Dismal Swamp, once covering 2,200 square miles, has been described as an area of history and mystery. Blackburn discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp, such as George Washington, who designed a plan to drain the swamp.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p40-42, il, map
Record #:
5979
Author(s):
Abstract:
Flora MacDonald was a Scottish heroine who saved the life of \"Bonnie Prince Charlie,\" claimant to the British throne. Later she and her husband came to North Carolina hoping for a better life. They remained loyal to England during the Revolution; this angered many of their neighbors and forced their departure back to Scotland, where they lived out their lives.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p37-39, por, map
Record #:
5973
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington's past is remembered in a thirty-five block historical district. McDonald discusses how this area was saved for restoration and takes the reader on a tour of some of the restored homes and business buildings.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p33-36, il
Record #:
5976
Author(s):
Abstract:
Patterson takes the reader back to a colonial kitchen among the tryvets, spyettes, chauldrons, and gibcrokes, where cooks prepared \"possum laced with potatoes, Hopping John, and a frothy drink called Syllabub.\" Readers will find the kitchen and utensils quite different from those of today.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p19-22, 49, il
Subject(s):