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8 results for MacDonald, Flora, 1722-1790
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Record #:
5979
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Flora MacDonald was a Scottish heroine who saved the life of \"Bonnie Prince Charlie,\" claimant to the British throne. Later she and her husband came to North Carolina hoping for a better life. They remained loyal to England during the Revolution; this angered many of their neighbors and forced their departure back to Scotland, where they lived out their lives.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p37-39, por, map
Record #:
13383
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Flora Macdonald of Cape Fear country was a lady of great courage, patriotism, glamour, and misfortune. Flora saved the life of Bonnie Prince Charles, helping him to escape to France after his defeat at Culoden. Although arrested for her actions, she won the heart of London society as was set free. In 1750 she married Alan Macdonald and emigrated to America. Due to their royalist sentiments, their properties were confiscated and her husband imprisoned, leaving Flora to flee from Wilmington back to Scotland.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 16, Sept 1953, p7, 24, por, f
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Record #:
13493
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The search for Flora MacDonald's old home has lead explorers into Montgomery County. R. E. Wicker, an historian of Moore County, has moved the old plantation of Flora MacDonald out of Richmond, across the line into Montgomery. After 40 years of research, Wicker is satisfied that he has pinpointed the exact spot where the noted Scotchwoman and her family lived during their brief and stormy career in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 31, Jan 1954, p6, f
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Record #:
15077
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Richmond County is one of the oldest counties in the State. It was carved from Anson County in 1779 and has had an interesting history of progress and development. Richmond County is the home of the estate of Flora Macdonald and consequently Flora Macdonald College. It is also the home of the fifth oldest cotton mill, Richmond Manufacturing Company, in the State. Richmond County was also the stage for continual guerilla fighting during the Revolutionary War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 31, Dec 1940, p1-4, 20-22, f
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Record #:
15287
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In Harnett County lies a small, famous, old church called Barbecue, founded in 1757. This Presbyterian church was the pastorate of Reverend Campbell for a time until the Revolutionary War turned this Whig against his Tory congregation. Angus McDairmid next occupied the pulpit until 1802 when he tried to prevent Barbecue from being swept up in the frenzy of the Presbyterian revival; his efforts failed. Many others followed, even a Methodist preacher, and among worshipers at Barbecue were Flora McDonald and Alexander McRae.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 43, Mar 1940, p10-11, f
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Record #:
20043
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This is a biographical essay about Scottish native Flora Macdonald (MacDonald) who, while living in North Carolina, was noted for her association with a group of Scottish Highlanders living in the state devoted to the homeland, its traditions, and wearing Highland dress.
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Record #:
16060
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Flora MacDonald was regarded as fierce heroine in her native Scotland before arriving on the Killiegray plantation near Fayetteville in 1774. She encouraged fellow Scotsmen to take up arms against rebellious colonists that met with disaster at the Battle of Moores Creek on February 27, 1776. Three years later this tenacious woman lost her plantation as was forced to return to Scotland.
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Record #:
4698
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Flora MacDonald lived through the glory days and hard times. In 1745, she became a legend in her native Scotland by helping the pretender to the Scottish throne, Prince Charles, escape after he was defeated at the Battle of Culloden. Later she and her husband came to North Carolina, hoping for a better life. Their decision to remain loyal to England during the Revolution angered many and forced their return to Scotland, where they lived the reminder of their lives.
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