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7 results for Shells--North Carolina
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Record #:
12602
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's rarest shell collection belongs to James E. Wadsworth of Chapel Hill. Collected in the South Pacific, near the Admiralty Islands, Wadsworth's collection includes one hundred of the most beautiful and rarest specimens found to date.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 6, Aug 1957, p20, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
19262
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina coast is home to more than 1,000 different species of mollusks--a beach combers dream. Given the variety of shells for picking, the state even has a N.C. Shell Club.
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Record #:
24550
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author provides an overview of the types of shells found on North Carolina’s coast and how to collect, clean, and display them in an artistic manner.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 43 Issue 1, June 1975, p18-20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
29529
Abstract:
Hugh Porter came to North Carolina in the 1950s and quickly became known as 'Mr. Seashell' for his knowledge of mollusks. This year, North Carolina Sea Grant and the University of North Carolina Press are honoring Porter's contributions by celebrating the 20th anniversary of his book, 'Seashells of North Carolina.'
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2017, p32-33, por Periodical Website
Record #:
29372
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than seven-hundred different kinds of shell-bearing animals exist in North Carolina’s estuarine and marine waters. For seashell collectors, the most popular types of shells found in the state are hinged bivalves and gastropods. This guide offers advice on the best places and times to search for shells.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 6, June 1981, p40-50, il
Record #:
35483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Advice was dispensed by the author and her expert sources, including a professor from the University of North Carolina’s Institute of Marine Sciences. Examples of their tips were collection times, places (e.g. Shackleford Banks), care, and identification. To highlight their worth, commonly defined in souvenir status, the author noted other purposes, ranging from containers to decorations, from coinage to dye source.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, May/June 1977, p14-17, 59
Record #:
35774
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s purpose for collecting seashells could be considered unconventional and creative: simulated floral bouquets. Places she proposed to collect shells included fishermen’s nets to fish supply houses. Tools to use, Moore recommended hot glue gun and tweezers, assorted glues and cements, manicure scissors and toothpicks. For cleaning, the author recommended Clorox; for restoring color, oil.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 6, Oct 1979, p13