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36 results for Wetlands
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Record #:
8186
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Waterfowl depend on water. They nest on water, raise their young there, and feed in or near water. Without suitable nesting and wintering sites, waterfowl will not survive. Between 1940 and 1964, over forty-five million acres of wetlands were drained throughout the country. Protection of wetlands is vital to waterfowl survival. A major goal of waterfowl management is to blunt the impact of man's activities on ducks and geese. Poole discusses what has been done in the past, what is being done today, and what wildlife agencies hope to do in the future, and why.
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8193
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In Part II of his series, Poole continues his discussion of the plight of the North American waterfowl.
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Record #:
8367
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The public is slow in awakening to the value of wetlands. These coastal saltwater marshes are among the state's most important natural resources. Once they are lost, they are irreplaceable. Already many wetlands have been converted to housing developments, marinas, dumps, and other manmade structures. Taormina discusses wetlands for their importance in marine and wildlife habitats, erosion control, education, and psychological value.
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Record #:
8544
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The state's saltwater marshes serve waterfowl as nesting, resting, and feeding sites. Because of the controversies between conservationists and developers over the use of salt marshes, they are better known then freshwater marshes. Freshwater marshes are created by glaciers, river deltas, beaver dams, and manmade projects and are as important as the saltwater ones. They provide homes to countless birds, mammals, invertebrates, fish, reptiles, amphibians, and many kinds of plants.
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Record #:
9705
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Early discusses the state's salt marshes and their importance to sea life and other wildlife, and ultimately man.
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Record #:
740
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Many things are endangered by the contradictory laws and jurisdictions that govern the long-term welfare of our priceless, dwindling wetlands.
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Record #:
705
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Earley examines some of the questions relating to the wetland controversy.
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Record #:
2168
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The state's species of salamanders, frogs, and toads are facing an uncertain future as wetland habitats, which serve as breeding grounds are developed or drained. Approximately fifty percent of the state's permanent wetlands have been destroyed.
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Record #:
2203
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Generally, a freshwater marsh is a temporary wetland, existing until filled by sediment washing downstream. During its lifetime, the marsh provides food and shelter for plants and animals and also stores excess water when floods occur.
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Record #:
2202
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Seasonal wetlands are small areas that are wet only for a short period during the year. Some of the smallest of the state's wetlands, seasonal wetlands can be as little as two meters in diameter.
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Record #:
2207
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As the state's economy has grown, upwards of 50 percent of its wetlands have been lost. This statistic is questionable, however, because of a lack of data on the original extent of wetlands and disagreement over when a wetland is actually lost.
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Record #:
2206
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Some wetlands, such as swamps and marshes, are easily identifiable. Others, though, are dry several months each year. Wet or dry, both must meet three criteria to be classified as a wetland: wetland vegetation, hydric (wet) soil, and water evidence.
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Record #:
26814
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Wetlands in North Carolina are important and productive environments that provide people with a number of benefits. The federal government is inadvertently subsidizing the destruction of these habitats through the National Flood Insurance Program. Government insurance encourages development in areas inhabited by wildlife.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p3, il
Record #:
27622
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The General Assembly passed a regulatory reform bill removing environmental protections from isolated wetlands that are under one acre in size. The bill will benefit coastal developers and lessen regulations for polluters. Wetlands store water, provide habitat for endangered species, and reduce flooding during tropical storms. Additional effects on wetlands are explored.
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Record #:
28450
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Ecologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute of Marine Sciences are gathering new information about the effectiveness and outlook of restored wetlands in Wilson Bay. They are also measuring surface elevation and water quality in the marshes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2017, p32-35, il, por Periodical Website
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