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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Recycling
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Record #:
12513
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Started in 1986, the Carolinas Glass Recycling Program seeks to reduce the number of jars and bottles going into landfills each year. The program has the support of five glass manufacturing firms in the Carolinas that are investing $1 million in promotions, services and marketing support for recycling companies and organizations. The companies have also increased the amount of money they pay for recycled glass.
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Record #:
15929
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Many types of plastics are now recyclable. In North Carolina, Southeastern Container is giving assistance to smaller communities wishing to move toward recycling activities.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p11-13, f
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Record #:
18430
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One paradox of our time is that we are simultaneously running out of natural resources and running out of space for disposing of discarded materials made from those resources. In addition, the price of those resources is constantly rising. As a result, very many people and communities are interested in saving both money and landfill space by recycling as much disposable material as possible. In North Carolina many organizations and communities have recycling programs and are working toward that goal.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 50 Issue 4, Spring 1985, p23-28
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Record #:
25268
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The office supply company Staples has announced that it will be phasing out paper products sourced from endangered forests and will replace them with recycled paper products. There are several new guidelines and environmentalists are hopeful that the other supply companies will follow suit.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Winter 2003, p13, il
Record #:
25277
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Oysters provide a very important part in water filtration. This role is why the oyster shell recycling program is so important.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2004, p1, 6, il
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Record #:
26508
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North Carolina legislature set a goal to recycle 25 percent of the total waste stream. New technologies are helping to make recycling a more viable alternative to waste disposal, but there is still debate over costs. Industries see recycling as a potential for profit, but local municipalities see it as an expense.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
26589
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Recycling is becoming a greater priority for North Carolina citizens. Municipalities and civic groups are working together to educate and promote issues regarding waste management, landfills, costs of newsprint, and pollution.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1989, p6-8, il
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Record #:
26593
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Recycling is becoming more convenient and efficient for consumers in North Carolina. Municipal curbside programs have been started and there is interest of the private sector in creating markets.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1989, p8-10, il
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Record #:
28819
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From social injustice to environmental damage, local designers in North Carolina are trying to make the world a better place. Local clothing companies, from Liberation Threads to TS Designs, highlight the environmental, ethical, and cultural arguments for local materials, production, and distribution in their mission statements.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 46, Nov 2016, p30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30699
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The Unnatural Resources Fair in Greenville, North Carolina showcases adult and child creations made from reused items. The fair is hosted by the Unnatural Resources Institute, founded by Jacqueline Ponder. The institute’s mission is to promote and inspire creative and different ways to reuse materials.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 1, Jan 2011, p24-25, il, por
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Record #:
37165
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With the same theme as another article found in this edition, Susan Stafford Kelly' “Diamond Guys," this article profiles fifteen businesses in North Carolina owned by the same families. Included were Raleigh’s York Properties, established 1910; Hickory’s Keever’s Key and Repair Service, founded 1920; Salisbury’s Beaver Brothers, established 1911; Windsor’s Bertie County Peanuts, founded 1915.
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Record #:
36577
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This nonprofit organization, offering bicycles at affordable prices and the opportunity to learn how to repair and build a bicycle. With bicycle parts donated and business operated by volunteers, Asheville ReCyclery offers more than relatively affordable transportation to school or work. It means helping others improve their lives while contributing to a sense of community.
Record #:
36558
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For homeowners, renters, and business owners wanting a healthier and eco-friendly interior environment, Green Gauge, created by the Western North Carolina Building Council, can fulfill both goals. Actions recommended: use energy and water usage wisely, improve indoor air quality, and use sustainable building and landscaping materials. Benefits include lower utility bills, a reduction of carbon footprint, and increased home value.
Record #:
36191
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Reuse, recycle, and renew are buzz words generated by the ongoing environmental crisis. Ways wine bottles can be used after the party ends are ecologically conscious, creative, and practical. Uses included plant labels, row covers securers, and floral wreath additions.
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Record #:
36453
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The newly created office aimed to assure its sustained place by playing a role in sustaining the environment. Two years later, post-implementation of its Sustainability Management Plan, the department had lived up to its promise of sustainability. The city, partnering with local environmental groups, had reduced its carbon footprint by nearly thirty percent, through eco-friendly practices related to fuel, electricity, water system improvement, and recycling.