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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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25 results for Oysters
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Record #:
28791
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The boring sponge is narrowing the regions that are open to shellfish harvests free of the infestation. The boring sponge has a major effect on oyster populations and pose an economic problem to oyster farmers. The author discusses a study he created to test how oysters were affected by the substrate on which the oysters grow. The results of the study and the problem are detailed.
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Record #:
36263
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UNC system research and startup businesses generated over 2.6 billion dollars and created over 28,000 jobs. Also yielded were medical advancements such as gene therapy, businesses like GI Therapeutics, Inc., and protective measures of the state’s ecosystems aimed to improve oyster growth.
Record #:
26910
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Ocracoke Island residents harvested oysters long before Sir Walter Raleigh’s agents discovered the island. Following the Civil War, however, Ocracokers harvested increasing numbers of the shellfish and nurtured their beds to ensure that there would be plenty of oysters for generations. In 1890, tensions grew between native Ocracokers and outsiders whose dredging practices had virtually destroyed their oyster populations. Eventually, the state passed to protect Ocracoke’s oyster beds from over-fishing.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 12, May 2016, p30, 32, 34, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
27334
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The NC Sea Grant program is using story maps to explain oyster aquaculture and oyster reef restoration due to building interest across the state. The article explains the benefits of protecting oysters and encouraging their habitat for the health of the state’s ecosystem and the potential economic benefit of harvesting oysters.
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Record #:
27629
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Phil Gagnon, a resident of Emerald Isle and oyster harvester, discusses his oyster garden and encourages others to raise oysters as well.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2016, p24-26, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31544
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Celebrate the south’s bivalve renaissance at one of these new oyster bars. This article features two North Carolina restaurants, Sea Level in Charlotte and The Kathrine Brasserie and Bar in Winston-Salem.
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Record #:
23114
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The Daily Reflector's associate editor, Bobby Burns, continues his quest for an appealing oyster dish by preparing traditional oyster stew.
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Greenville: Life in the East (NoCar F264 G8 G743), Vol. Issue , Spring 2015, p15-17, il, por
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Record #:
22589
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North Carolina oysters are a keystone species for the health of the state's estuaries. Since 2003, a diverse group of stakeholders has worked to develop initiatives related to the protection and restoration of the state's oyster populations.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2015, p18-19, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30692
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Oyster roasts are an eastern North Carolina tradition during the winter. In this article, the author discusses traditions in Plymouth, North Carolina, the process of roasting oysters, and family oyster recipes.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 2014, p16, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16016
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For years the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries has been building oyster reefs from Dare County on the northern coast to Brunswick County on the southern. Miller discusses how it is done and the success of the program.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Feb 2012, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9444
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Disease, overharvesting, pollution, poor water quality, and habitat destruction have caused the Eastern oyster to decline over 90 percent in the state during the last century. Concern for the oyster's future has brought together state agencies like the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries and other state conservation groups to chart a course of action. There is now a statewide plan to save North Carolina's oysters by building hatcheries and recycling oyster shells.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6924
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The North Carolina Oyster Festival, now in its twenty-fourth year, is held in October on Ocean Isle Beach. The festival draws 25,000 people and is a celebration of the coastal life of North Carolina, above and below the water. Activities include an oyster stew cook-off, musical entertainment, shopping, and the popular North Carolina Oyster Shucking Contest.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p192-194, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25068
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Seafood companies are looking for new ways to sell seafood. Their best idea is to come up with pre-prepackaged value-added foods that can become a quick lunch or dinner option.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p26-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25277
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Oysters provide a very important part in water filtration. This role is why the oyster shell recycling program is so important.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2004, p1, 6, il
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Record #:
17042
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Leggett discusses how the oyster reigns in eastern North Carolina, from recipes to restaurants.
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