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7 results for Movie industry
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Record #:
24382
Author(s):
Abstract:
DeLaurentiis Entertainment Group is housed in Wilmington, North Carolina and owns seven soundstages. It produced seven of the twenty-two movies filmed in the state in 1987, causing North Carolina to be fourth in the nation in terms of movie-making profits. Now, the company is struggling financially, which may have a negative effect on bringing in future movie-makers to the state.
Record #:
24414
Abstract:
Dino de Laurentiis, a prodigious movie producer, is building his primary permanent production facility in Wilmington, prompting some people to consider North Carolina as Hollywood number two.
Record #:
16082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Depression era North Carolinians sought to escape their poverty and despair through cinematic magic. One venue was the Capitol Theater in Raleigh which offered vitaphone talking movies.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 13 Issue 4, May 1974, p14-15, il
Full Text:
Record #:
27830
Author(s):
Abstract:
The way film and movie theater experience has changed over the last ten years with new technology is explored. Jim Carol of Durham’s Carolina Theater explains how the changes have affected art house cinemas and smaller local theaters. These theaters have struggled as studios produced large-budget movies and release them only to multiplex or Imax theaters. The way films are distributed have also affected smaller theaters and many like Chapel Hill’s Varsity Theater or the Galaxy Cinema in Cary have either closed or are changing their business models to adapt.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 1, January 2010, p15-16 Periodical Website
Record #:
34734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davis, North Carolina, was home to the first movie theater in Carteret County. Beaufort soon followed the trend and in 1911 opened the Sea Breeze Theatre. A family business, the Sea Breeze was operated by William Luther Paul and his children. Projected by hand, films were shown at the theatre once per week. As they were silent, subtitles were included. To aid in the movie going experience, Paul designed a number of sound effects which could be operated in the projection booth including train whistles, horses running, and horns playing. When sound was finally incorporated into movies, a Victrola would play the associated record as the movie ran. By 1916, movies had expanded to include serial films with episodes playing over a number of weeks. Paul continued to experiment with sound and by 1928 had a working model of a Vitaphone system. The theatre operated through World War II.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p8-11, il
Record #:
34735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loftin recalls visiting the Sea Breeze Theatre during his childhood in Beaufort. After receiving his weekly allowance of fifteen cents, Loftin would purchase enough penny candy to outlast an afternoon at the movies. Meeting up with friends, the children would enter the theatre for a dime. The movies showed in order—first a cartoon, followed by the latest installment in a serial. Then, finally, the feature presentation—cowboy films were favorites of the author.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p12-13, il
Record #:
36223
Abstract:
Some were real life converted to reel life, such as Philadelphia (1993) and A Time to Kill (1996). Others were based on novels: Inherit the Wind (1958) and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). The remaining six were also fictitious accounts of the justice system. Whatever the plot’s source, they offered insightful and entertaining portrayals of life from both sides of the counsellor’s table.