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15 results for Film Industry
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Record #:
22756
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Abstract:
This article profiles the film industry in North Carolina.
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Record #:
25596
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North Carolina is the fastest growing film industry in the nation. This can be attributed to the state’s low level of unionization, low costs of filming, aggressive efforts of the state government, long shooting seasons, and varied landscapes.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 18, Sept 28-Oct 11 1984, p3, 5, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27051
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Recognizing the devastation wrought on North Carolina’s film industry, the General Assembly increased grant funding for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. The boutique movie theater movement finally reached the Triangle with three new so-called luxury theaters opening. Local filmmakers and festivals also had a successful year.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 51, Dec 2015, p26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27830
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The way film and movie theater experience has changed over the last ten years with new technology is explored. Jim Carol of Durham’s Carolina Theater explains how the changes have affected art house cinemas and smaller local theaters. These theaters have struggled as studios produced large-budget movies and release them only to multiplex or Imax theaters. The way films are distributed have also affected smaller theaters and many like Chapel Hill’s Varsity Theater or the Galaxy Cinema in Cary have either closed or are changing their business models to adapt.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 1, January 2010, p15-16 Periodical Website
Record #:
27827
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The state of film production in North Carolina is getting better. Direct spending on film in the state is expected to be almost six times what it was in 2010 (75 million to 450 million). Major films like The Hunger Games, Iron Man 3 and TV shows Homeland, Revenge, and Hart of Dixie are currently filming in North Carolina or plan to film in North Carolina in the next year. Wilmington and Charlotte are major film production areas. The success of the industry is credited to Governor Perdue and the legislature for offering new film incentives in 2011 which have attracted new films.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 52, December 2011, p21-22 Periodical Website
Record #:
28086
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North Carolina Film Office Director Aaron Syrett discusses challenges facing the regional film industry. The state legislature has approved an incentives package to help revitalize the state’s film industry, but film industry strikes are slowing production. Reality television shows have forced television movies off of the air and many of those movies were made in Wilmington, NC. Additionally, fewer television shows are being filmed in the state. Syrett does believe that NC has the potential to become a major hub for independent film making.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 1, January 2008, p18 Periodical Website
Record #:
28131
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The history of how the Triangle area became open to art films over the last 25 years is detailed by local critic Godfrey Cheshire. Part of what helped the film scene thrive was writing about the films and the inclusion of local film festivals. The area will likely not become a popular place for filmmaking and the scene is changing with the internet and an aging movie-going population.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 15, April 2008, p51 Periodical Website
Record #:
28472
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Film industry spending in North Carolina has declined significantly over the last five years. The industry has suffered after the General Assembly gutted a more generous incentive program three years ago. While North Carolina’s film infrastructure is one of the best outside of California, film production companies are lured elsewhere because of better incentives. Unclear is how the 2016 House Bill 2 or “bathroom bill” has affected the state’s ability to attract films.
Record #:
28229
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The state’s new film incentive package benefits low-budget films as much as it does Hollywood blockbuster films. The General Assembly set a low threshold for the film incentive so that the state could assist local, independent, and low budget filmmakers. This will cause more films to be produced in the state and may help keep students in the state who study at universities in North Carolina. Additionally, more jobs will be created and the industry will continue to grow.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 12, March 2007, p20 Periodical Website
Record #:
28228
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North Carolina’s film industry is booming again. Last summer, the General Assembly offered new economic incentives to lure feature film production back to the state and the move is working. Screen Gems studios in Wilmington currently has five film and TV productions filming including, The Marc Pease Experience, Bolden, Nights in Rodanthe, Cabin Fever 2, and One Tree Hill. The increase in production has also brought jobs back in the industry.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 12, March 2007, p18-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
29179
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Recently, Hamlet, North Carolina was chosen as the backdrop for a new film because its buildings and Main Street date to the era needed for story. Hamlet, and many other places, are making millions as filmmakers and actors utilize towns, landscapes, and actors from the state.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 3, March 1991, p8, por
Record #:
29185
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North Carolina is ranked the No. 3 filmmaking state in the nation, behind California and New York, since 1985. In 1990, 52 major films and television shows were filmed in North Carolina, an industry that put $426 million in the state's economy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Apr 1991, p8, por
Record #:
30304
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The North Carolina Film Office is projecting over two-hundred-million dollars in revenue for the 2007 North Carolina film industry. The state has a very competitive tax incentive package, and offers many qualified industry professionals and studios to make it easy for filming to take place. There are about twenty films done every year, and each film brings a lot of money into the state’s economy.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 87 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p13-14, il, por
Record #:
36144
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The base known familiarly as Cherry Point has followed a longstanding military tradition for North Carolina, with Marines on coastal duty since 1777. Cherry Point’s history included its founding, attributed to the Quantico, Virginia base being deemed inadequate. Also noted in its profile: base name’s source; originally designated location; role in World War II; inclusion of female Marines; and celebrity pilots such as Tyrone Power.
Record #:
36223
Abstract:
Some were real life converted to reel life, such as Philadelphia (1993) and A Time to Kill (1996). Others were based on novels: Inherit the Wind (1958) and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). The remaining six were also fictitious accounts of the justice system. Whatever the plot’s source, they offered insightful and entertaining portrayals of life from both sides of the counsellor’s table.