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4 results for Legal practices--History
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Record #:
20547
Abstract:
This article describes the practices and ethical standards of the legal professions in the period between 1820-1860. Elements such as advertising for services, practicing in and traveling to different courts within the circuit, courtroom practices, the administration of justice, trial procedure, membership in the bar, and ethical standards are explored.
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Record #:
24273
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1995, North Carolina started its Business Court when the North Carolina state legislature added funds for another state Superior Court judge. The Business Court has become a model for many other states, including Georgia and Delaware.
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Record #:
35749
Author(s):
Abstract:
Olive’s analysis of how crimes were handled in the US during the nineteenth century revealed that standards were more different than similar. For example, the punishment for blasphemy was jail time and a fine. The punishment for being a common scold (or nagging woman) was placement on a ducking stool and plunging into water. Such punishments revealed that socio-cultural standards were much stricter as well as often double standard.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p14-15
Record #:
36223
Abstract:
Some were real life converted to reel life, such as Philadelphia (1993) and A Time to Kill (1996). Others were based on novels: Inherit the Wind (1958) and To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). The remaining six were also fictitious accounts of the justice system. Whatever the plot’s source, they offered insightful and entertaining portrayals of life from both sides of the counsellor’s table.