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Record #:
7402
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Leary Davis, who received his law degree from Wake Forest University in 1967, started the law school at Campbell University in 1976. He designed a curriculum that focused not only on the law but how to practice it. The trial-advocacy program was one of the first of its kind and won an award from the American College of Trial Lawyers. Now Davis is leaving Campbell for Elon University near Greensboro, where he will be starting a law school which will open in 2006. There are only five law schools in the state, and when Elon opens, Davis will have started two of them.
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Record #:
13489
Abstract:
This photo was given by Superior Court Judge Henry A. Grady to the State and identifies the UNC summer law class of 1900.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 30, Dec 1953, p7, f
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Record #:
15074
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Names that brighten the pages of North Carolina history are to be found on the roll of law students who attended classes in a one-room, mud-daubed log cabin several miles up the headwaters of the north fork of Swannanoa River, northeast of Asheville. Such was the reputation of this school, conducted by Judge John Lancaster Bailey of Pasquotank County, that students were outstanding in their communities. Among those who gained places of public prominence from Judge Bailey's Law School were William Bailey, J. K. Connally, Washington Hardy, Thomas Johnson, and one woman student, Grace Hallyburton.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 29, Dec 1940, p7
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Record #:
24057
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Students in North Carolina's Schools of Law take courses in and practice Pro Bono work during their professional lives. The author explains the benefits of Pro Bono work for both lawyers and the state.
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Record #:
22609
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Abstract:
Under recent scrutiny from an article on Infilaw, a company that owns and operates three law schools in the United States including the largest law school in North Carolina--Charlotte School of Law, findings show that compared to other laws schools in the state, Charlotte School of Law is unusual in that it has the largest attrition rate and the student body incurs the most student loan debt.
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