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4 results for Tax incentives
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Record #:
16697
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic incentives have helped companies relocate to the state and others in-state to expand. Jordan discusses three major state-level programs that provide incentives: the Job development Investment Grant (JDIG), One North Carolina Fund, and Article 3J Tax Credits. Other incentive programs beyond the big three are discussed.
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Record #:
20570
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of North Carolina cities and towns are seeking to attract new business by offering incentive grants linked to property taxes. This means that a business that invests money in a new plant and equipment would receive property tax relief for a specified number of years. In essence the local government is refunding part of the taxes paid on property and creating a partial exception of the property from taxation. This bulletin examines whether such action is legal under the NC Constitution.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 84, June 1998, p1-4, f
Record #:
22068
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1984 Italian movie producer Dino De Laurentiis arrived in Wilmington to build a studio. Since then over 350 films, television shows, and commercials have been shot there. The industry also has moved to other parts of the state, like Charlotte, Asheville, and the Appalachians. Last year, producers spent around $254 million in the state which created 4,000 jobs and 25,000 part-time and temporary ones. Financial incentives from the state have helped keep this industry working in the state. However, unless the incentives are renewed in June by the Republican-controlled NC General Assembly, they will expire at the end of 2014. What happens then to the film industry is uncertain.
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Record #:
28472
Author(s):
Abstract:
Film industry spending in North Carolina has declined significantly over the last five years. The industry has suffered after the General Assembly gutted a more generous incentive program three years ago. While North Carolina’s film infrastructure is one of the best outside of California, film production companies are lured elsewhere because of better incentives. Unclear is how the 2016 House Bill 2 or “bathroom bill” has affected the state’s ability to attract films.