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7 results for Theaters
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Record #:
3071
Abstract:
Diane Gilboa and Laurie Merrifield are co-founders of the Triangle Arts Express in Durham, a company that seeks to take the hassle out of theater- going by providing round-trip transportation, dinner, tickets, and dessert.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 14 Issue 41, Nov 1996, p19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
3078
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between Reconstruction and World War I, theaters were the most popular entertainment, with 159 in 82 cities statewide. S.A. Schloss, who brought all types of theatrical forms to the state, was the best-known owner of this period.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 5, Oct 1996, p30-32, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8815
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has long been a pioneer in the movie industry. The state was the site of the first all-cartoon show, the first double feature, and showed the first “talkies” in the South. Charlotte served as a movie distribution center during the 1920s and was considered a “second Hollywood.” The first movies seen by North Carolinians were shown by George Bailey and Fox Howard in 1906. The two men showed a movie in New Bern's Masonic Theatre. The movie was a success and the men took their movie to Wilmington's Bijou Theatre on December 24, 1906. The Bijou was the state's first theatre built exclusively to show movie pictures. In 1921, North Carolina produced a film on the Lost Colony which was shown all over the state. It was America's first educational film. Today, the movie industry is still thriving in North Carolina. In 1980 the N.C. Commerce Department created the N.C. Film Office, who predicts that the film industry will boost the state's economy $75 million to $100 million annually.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 7, Dec 1983, p12-13, por
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Record #:
23975
Abstract:
At N.C. State, Stewart Theatre undergoes much-needed renovations to make the space more interesting and to draw in more visitors.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 34, August 2015, p28-29, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, long-known as a hub for the arts, is also stealing the show with numerous stage theaters, a nurturing arts council, and a nationally recognized film festival.
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Record #:
28754
Author(s):
Abstract:
Center for the Arts and its Sweet Bee Theater is a new theatrical venue in Pittsboro, North Carolina founded by Craig Witter and Tammy Matthews. Witter and Matthews also started Pittsboro Youth Theater, an organization that offers dramatic training for children’s productions.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Feb 2017, p28, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Davis, North Carolina, was home to the first movie theater in Carteret County. Beaufort soon followed the trend and in 1911 opened the Sea Breeze Theatre. A family business, the Sea Breeze was operated by William Luther Paul and his children. Projected by hand, films were shown at the theatre once per week. As they were silent, subtitles were included. To aid in the movie going experience, Paul designed a number of sound effects which could be operated in the projection booth including train whistles, horses running, and horns playing. When sound was finally incorporated into movies, a Victrola would play the associated record as the movie ran. By 1916, movies had expanded to include serial films with episodes playing over a number of weeks. Paul continued to experiment with sound and by 1928 had a working model of a Vitaphone system. The theatre operated through World War II.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2007-2008, p8-11, il