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26 results for Medicine--Folklore
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Record #:
23704
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The Madstone or “Bezoar Stone” was once believed to be the most highly prized piece of medicine anyone could possess. These stones were used to treat snakebites, rabies and lock jaw and were passed down in families for generations. Dr. R. G. Cobb of Kinston, NC owned a madstone passed down in his family. There were other popular remedies long ago that included “Asafetida bags,” also called “Devil’s Dung,” stinky bags put around the necks of children to keep flu, disease and evil spirits away. There was “Father John’s,” that tasted like licorice and cod-liver oil. There was “Terpine Hydrate Cough Expectorate,” that contained codeine that would knock out kids for 14 hours. There were parents who believed in Musterrol, Vicks salve, and Castoria, a castor oil substitute.
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Record #:
35048
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A short story about the superstitions that a screech owl could foretell a death.
Record #:
35095
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A story about a girl who got bit by a venomous snake and whose father tried traditional remedies before going to a physician.
Record #:
35132
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This is a list of remedies that can be made at the home for ailments such as itchiness, wounds, coughing, and more serious illnesses like the measles.
Record #:
35279
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The author noted that swamps held many plants that were used in home remedies.
Record #:
35293
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The author lists ingredients commonly found in drugstores that were included in people’s home remedies. Along with the ingredient, Wilson lists what it was ailments it was used for.
Record #:
35291
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Found in Appalachian areas and into the Midwest, there are only a few examples of “talking out fire,” in records, but the author aims to study this phenomenon of relieving the pain from burn victims.
Record #:
35802
Author(s):
Abstract:
With knowledge passed down from generations, Flora Johnson sold herbal remedies for a wide array of ailments, including arthritis, diabetes, the common cold, and upset stomachs. q
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Record #:
35926
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It was proof that fashion—albeit of the folk remedy variety--always comes back around. Among the remedies were recommendations for illnesses such as colds and croup. Others were suggestions for nail and bees sting injuries. Others were proposals for hair and oral health.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p36-39
Record #:
36172
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Abstract:
Not only can the profiled spices make dishes delicious, their value includes nutritious. Adding thyme, chili pepper, sage, cinnamon, turmeric, and oregano in the daily diet could combat diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s. Other health benefits noted: anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, antioxidant, antidepressant, fat burning, cholesterol lowering, and immunity boosting.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , January/February 2017, p14-16, 18, 20-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
36202
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Tradescant the Younger is credited for finding plants such as the Virginia Creeper and Spiderwort, with the latter having his contribution reflected in its Latin name, Tradescantia virginiana. Along with being a popular garden plant, Spiderwort can be found in abandoned farms and homesteads, a testament to their former importance in agrarian life.
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