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Record #:
29595
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The Last Castle is Denise Kiernan’s new nonfiction book about the Vanderbilt legacy, the Biltmore House and its surrounding estate. The book also tracts Asheville’s transformation and economic boom.
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Record #:
29791
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The third book in the best-selling Serafina Book Series by author Robert Beatty will be released nationwide on July 4, 2017. The story is set at the Biltmore Estate and in the mountains of Western North Carolina, and adapted as a Disney-Hyperion mystery-thriller film series. This month, Beatty will give a reading of the opening chapters in his hometown of Asheville.
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Record #:
30738
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Eric J. Cox of Asheboro, North Carolina was a Marine Corps. Corporal during the invasion of Iraq. Cox published his memoir, Cpl Cox, in 2009 through his own business, The Charlotte Press. This article provides a short biography of Cox and excerpts of his book, which includes diary entries, letters, and details of his experiences in Iraq and Cherry Point, North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 1, Jan 2010, p21-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30827
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Bruce Roberts is a North Carolina photographer, journalist and author. In his new book, Just Yesterday, Roberts presents details of what North Carolina looked like in the mid-to-late twentieth century. Divided into the state’s geographic regions, images show the people and places of the Outer Banks, east, piedmont, and mountains.
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Record #:
30902
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North Carolina’s diverse culture has inspired many distinctive guidebooks, including two new books on native writers, arts and agriculture. Book reviews are provided for “Literary Trails of the North Carolina Mountains: A Guidebook” by Georgann Eubanks, and “Homegrown/Handmade: Art Roads and Farm Trails” by John F. Blair.
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Record #:
31095
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This article provides excerpts from the book, “River Spirits: A Collection of Lumbee Writings,” edited by Stanley Knick and published by the University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s Native American Resource Center. The book provides a window into the Lumbee culture, and features a variety of work about the tribe’s past and hopeful future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 8, Aug 2004, p16-19, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31197
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David S. Cecelski has produced the first major study of slavery on the North Carolina coast, published in his book called, The Waterman’s Song. In addition to detailed descriptions of the places, society and working conditions that maritime African Americans encountered, Cecelski recounts stories of individuals who lived through these times. He also discusses the role of slave fishermen in developing the traditional fishing culture in coastal North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 3, Mar 2002, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31512
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“The Woodwright’s Shop,” the made-in-North Carolina television series about 19th Century woodcraft techniques, is going national this fall. Roy Underhill’s television series will be aired nationally by Public Broadcasting Service, and his new book based on the television series is currently being published. This article discusses Underhill’s background, and use of alternative technology and humor to entertain the woodworking layman.
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Record #:
31518
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Art Gore, a professional photographer, published a new book called, “Speak Softly to the Echoes.” The book is a collection of memories he calls “echoes,” and features photographs and nostalgic stories about his youth in Hoke County. In this article, Gore discusses his photography and early influences at Wake Forest College.
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Record #:
31555
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James Valentine, a North Carolina photographer, and Marguerite Schumann, a writer in Chapel Hill, collaborated on a new book called, “North Carolina.” The book features photographs and text aiming to inspire a sense of urgency about the need for environmental stewardship. Images capture natural areas, as well as cultural and historical landmarks throughout North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 11, Nov 1979, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31678
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This year, many North Carolina writers published award-winning books. There was a total of fifty-six books entered in the competitions for which awards were presented during Culture Week, November 12-16. This article highlights the winning books and provides background on each of the authors.
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Record #:
34287
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David Sedaris is widely considered America’s leading humorist. In an interview, Sedaris discusses growing up in Raleigh, North Carolina. His new book, Calypso, is a memoir set in Emerald Isle.
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Record #:
35476
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After the death of Richard Jente, a professor at UNC Chapel Hill, the university acquired a collection of his books, proverbs, and other miscellaneous works for the library.
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Record #:
35916
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The Moral Majority was a conservative Christian PAC with a mission to remove believed “anti-God, anti-family” materials from NC public schools and school libraries. Such an agenda concerned librarians and educators about the consequences of purging shelves and banning books. Concerning other library-related issues related to access, included was how inflation and rising prices of books and periodicals curtailed the building of collections.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p16-17
Record #:
36301
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An educational software and e-textbook company has proven to be a maven for North Carolina’s current educational system. Promoting Discovery Educations’ endeavor is a discussion of receptivity already found among today’s students and growing receptivity among educators for their products.