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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for Libraries and state
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Record #:
11752
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carrie L. Broughton became North Carolina's State Librarian in 1917. She is the first woman to head a department of the North Carolina state government.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 13, Aug 1934, p7, 9, por
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Record #:
17848
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public libraries fell under the authority of local government as stated in The General Statutes of North Carolina but some debated whether the public library system needed state support. The state's libraries were reassessed after the release of the American Library Association established national standards for adequate library service. Analysis demonstrated faltering standards both compared to the state's expectation and national requirements.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 31 Issue 6, Apr 1965, p12-14, 19, il
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Record #:
17939
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The North Carolina Adult Film Project began in 1952 and was a cooperative measure between libraries across the state and the North Carolina State Library. The North Carolina State Library decided to lend out its 16-mm film to all 350 libraries across the state, many of which could not afford to purchase these films independently. Stipulations in lending out these films were that these could not be shown where admission was being charged and could not be used in a classroom setting.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 33 Issue 8, May 1967, p13-14
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Record #:
17991
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article is a critique of public libraries throughout the state and the failings of this system for those North Carolinians who are illiterate. As a member of the Governor's Commission on Library Resources, the author suggests that libraries should not just be repositories for books. The 1964 commission proposed several changes including developing a more cooperative funding scheme including local, state, and federal funds and forming a statewide Citizens Committee for Better Libraries to be represented in every county.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Dec 1967, p5-7, il
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Record #:
18045
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Abstract:
A new technological development for state libraries was a first for the nation. The IN-WATS, Inward Wide Area Telephone Service, was a reference service begun February 1, 1968. In cooperation with Southern Bell Telephone Company, the system allows any state librarian to make toll-free calls to the Reference Service Division of the state library in need of information not locally available.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 34 Issue 9, June 1968, p26-27
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Record #:
20450
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1927, only 35% of the state's citizens had access to public library services but by 1942 this number increased dramatically to 85%. Though a number of variables factor into the expansion of public library services, the author credits the state-wide Works Progress Administration (WPA) Library Project with being the most influential. Sponsored by the North Carolina Library Commission and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, the WPA Library project's two main goals were to \"strengthen existing library agencies\" and \"help establish permanent service on county or regional basis.\"
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Record #:
28506
Author(s):
Abstract:
Community led book boxes are becoming popular across the state. North Carolina has more than 500 of these registered as Little Free Libraries (LFL). These libraries are often started by individuals who possess a love of reading and want to share it with others, while developing a sense of community.
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Record #:
29293
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Abstract:
In North Carolina’s public school system, local school boards approve the policy used to select texts and library books. In coming months, at least two dozen local school boards can expect to see their policies challenged by angry Moral Majority members who claim the public schools have undercut their efforts to rear Christian children.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p18-25, por
Record #:
29333
Author(s):
Abstract:
If someone is looking to find information on North Carolina's 100 counties, including census information, they need look no further than the online data bases and CD-Rom technology available at the State Library in Raleigh. The NC Information network provides a link between local libraries and the state's academic, federal, corporate, and public libraries.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Oct 1991, p8, por
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Record #:
30693
Author(s):
Abstract:
A bill that has been pending in Congress for six years has finally been passed with the President's approval to provide over $37 million in federal grants to states in the next five years for public library services. North Carolina will receive the third largest allotment with over $303,000 to aid rural inhabitants with no access to free books.
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Record #:
35916
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Moral Majority was a conservative Christian PAC with a mission to remove believed “anti-God, anti-family” materials from NC public schools and school libraries. Such an agenda concerned librarians and educators about the consequences of purging shelves and banning books. Concerning other library-related issues related to access, included was how inflation and rising prices of books and periodicals curtailed the building of collections.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p16-17
Record #:
38182
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last has not been seen of rose gardens or libraries, the author suggested. Graff’s reminder for both is Sunnyside Rose Garden, one with local historical relevance and found out more about with the help of librarians. Another truth discovered at the main library in uptown Charlotte: the greater relevance of libraries to millennials in comparison to Generation X and baby boomers. As for libraries’ importance to the homeless, unemployed, and politicians, the author considered their access to warmth, internet, and information about past public servants’ faux pas.