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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Basket makers
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Record #:
16258
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Abstract:
In a modern, innovative hot-air balloon factory in Statesville lies a home for a thriving folk art--handwoven wicker basketry.
Record #:
31578
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Pine needlecraft is one of the ancient arts of basket weaving in North Carolina. Neta Bezalla of Randolph County teaches pine needlecraft courses at the Continuing Education Department of Montgomery Technical Institute in Troy. In this article, Bezalla describes pine needlecraft and the elaborate process of sewing with pine needles.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 11, Nov 1978, p21, por
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Record #:
31694
Author(s):
Abstract:
Basket making is one of the oldest crafts in North Carolina. The first of a two-part series, this article discusses the history of basket weaving in North Carolina, and describes the native plants, materials, and patterns used in the craft. Also discussed are three general basket making methods, including plaiting, weaving, and coiling.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1973, p10-11, il
Record #:
31701
Author(s):
Abstract:
Basket weaving is among North Carolina’s most ancient crafts. The second of a two-part series, this article discusses the basket making method of coiling, basket materials, and patterns. Many of the baskets made in North Carolina have been crafted from pine needles, corn husks, and other native plants.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 9, Sept 1973, p10-11, il
Record #:
32244
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author highlights some recent NC business news, including an acquisition of a pharmaceutical company by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. In other news, the Mylecraft Manufacturing Company owned by Mrs. L. V. Myles was willed to the town of Rich Square upon her death.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 13, Nov 1958, p30-31
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Record #:
35801
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a nonagenarian from Huntersville, touted as one of the last of his kind in NC. Included in Leon Berry’s profile were his inspiration for taking up the trade (his father), a description of basket making, their purposes (ex. carrying cotton). Concluding the profile was the extent of agrarian popularity for a trade that, in the Berry family at least, may conclude with him.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p49
Record #:
35803
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the few basket weavers left, Leon Berry learned the trade from his father. Used primarily for holding freshly picked cotton, livestock feed, or catching fish, baskets were a staple product on any farm.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
36957
Abstract:
Butch and Louise Goings are professional artisans with a lifelong commitment to preserving tradition. Louise is a basket maker, a skill learned from her mother, and Butch does wood carvings.
Record #:
36329
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within the McKinley family, everyone had a purpose; fishermen and hunters provided and were basket weavers for fish traps, someone learned to play music, and other person acted as the family doctor for minor injuries. Basket making had been passed down through the family for generations but with changing time and practices, the art of basket weaving is being lost.