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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
9447
Abstract:
In 1901, Eleanor Vance and Charlotte Yale came to Asheville as missionaries after earlier graduating from the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago with the purpose of helping people in the mountain communities. They went on to teach valuable weaving and wood carving skills to many of the residents and eventually founded Biltmore Estate Industries, one of the country's most famous crafts enterprises. While weaving was done at Biltmore, hand-carved wooden toys were made by the Tryon Toy-Makers and Wood-Carvers Shop in Tryon. The most famous creation from this shop was Morris the Horse, which became a town trademark.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p114-116, 118, 120, 122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15384
Abstract:
Mrs. Findley Mast developed an interest hand weaving and traveled to the Blue Ridge Mountains to gain first-hand knowledge from generations of weavers. As she learned her craft in the western mountains, news arrived of Woodrow Wilson's daughter's, Jessie, wedding. Mrs. Mast decided to send Jessie a wedding present, a bedspread hand-woven by Mrs. Findley and the women teaching her the craft.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 11, Aug 1935, p7, 22, il
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Record #:
27302
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Valdese Weavers near Charlotte, North Carolina have been in the textile business for over a century. The employees still learn how to weave, a process that takes years to master.
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Record #:
27818
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Biltmore Estate Industries began in the late nineteenth century with an instructional woodworking class taught by Charlotte Yale and Eleanor Vance, and supported by Edith Vanderbilt. In the early 20th century, Yale and Vance expanded the reach of these classes to teach mountain women how to produce finer wool fabric. Biltmore Estate Industries demonstrated how popular and viable commercial weaving could be for the Asheville area. Following George Vanderbilt’s death, ownership changed hands and the material produced by the women came to be known as Biltmore Homespun. Today, the industry is owned and operated by the Blomberg family who purchased it in the 1950s.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p30, 32, 34, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31578
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Pine needlecraft is one of the ancient arts of basket weaving in North Carolina. Neta Bezalla of Randolph County teaches pine needlecraft courses at the Continuing Education Department of Montgomery Technical Institute in Troy. In this article, Bezalla describes pine needlecraft and the elaborate process of sewing with pine needles.
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Record #:
31694
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Basket making is one of the oldest crafts in North Carolina. The first of a two-part series, this article discusses the history of basket weaving in North Carolina, and describes the native plants, materials, and patterns used in the craft. Also discussed are three general basket making methods, including plaiting, weaving, and coiling.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1973, p10-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
31701
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Basket weaving is among North Carolina’s most ancient crafts. The second of a two-part series, this article discusses the basket making method of coiling, basket materials, and patterns. Many of the baskets made in North Carolina have been crafted from pine needles, corn husks, and other native plants.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 9, Sept 1973, p10-11, il Periodical Website