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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Cherokee Indians--North Carolina--Culture
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Record #:
18699
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Abstract:
Dancer, choreographer, and actor Eddie Swimmer discusses his Cherokee roots, culture, and the Cherokee Historical Association's production of Unto These Hills, directed by Swimmer himself in this interview with Gina Caison.
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Record #:
19660
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cherokee, North Carolina has changed greatly over the past one-hundred years as the Cherokee culture has changed concurrently. At the turn of the 20th century, the Bureau of Ethnology reported that the Indian day is nearly spent. At the turn of the 21st century, Cherokee has adapted to modern culture and thrived while doing so. While changing to meet the times, many in the community continue to spread traditional Cherokee culture through the art of storytelling. By collecting these stories, the community can be assured that Cherokee culture will always survive.
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Record #:
29911
Author(s):
Abstract:
Home Land is a new exhibit at the Asheville Art Museum honoring Native American art, culture and history. Most pieces were provided by collector Lambert Wilson and Eastern Band Cherokee artist Shan Goshorn. Goshorn also provided letters and narratives pertaining to the Trail of Tears and centuries-old medicine stories.
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Record #:
36891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Belt is a Cherokee Nation member, native speaker, and language instructor; as an advocate for language revitalization, Belt believes language is a fundamental aspect of every culture.
Record #:
36957
Abstract:
Butch and Louise Goings are professional artisans with a lifelong commitment to preserving tradition. Louise is a basket maker, a skill learned from her mother, and Butch does wood carvings.