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37 results for Asheville--History
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Record #:
29023
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Abstract:
The history, culture, and life in the Montford neighborhood in Asheville is described. The Victorian, Neoclassical, and Colonial Revival architecture of the houses in the neighborhood is described with photographs of houses. The businesses, the streetcar system, cemeteries, and the local theater are also profiled.
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Record #:
27312
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The Blue Ridge Parkway was constructed during the middle 20th century to connect the Shenandoah National Park in Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina. Many homesteads were relocated due to eminent domain and the process of roadway construction. Many left behind belongings and furniture now considered folk art. These pieces of folk art can be seen on display in Asheville at the Asheville History Center as part of the Blue Ridge Parkway Exhibit.
Record #:
27319
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Abstract:
Hood Tours explore Asheville’s African-American history in the areas of arts, environmentalism, and entrepreneurship. The educational experience covers both past and present African-American history with particular attention given to E.W. Pearson (1906-1946) who was a prominent historical figure in Asheville.
Record #:
27313
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Asheville’s Flatiron Building is a unique example of architecture and the neoclassical style designed in 1926 by Albert C. Wirth.
Record #:
28540
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The Young Men’s Institute Band of Asheville and their history is detailed. Started by George Vanderbilt in 1893, the YMI served African American men and boys who helped construct the Biltmore Estate. The instrumental makeup of the band, their performances, their style of music, and their place in American music history are detailed.
Record #:
29715
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Willis Pack came to Asheville in 1884 for its healthful climate, and discovered the area was a prime location for growth. Over the next twenty years, he donated money to develop the downtown and surrounding areas.
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Record #:
22495
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In 1898, the wedding of Lieutenant Robert P. Johnston and Alexandra Mary Garrett made the front of the local newspaper. The happy occasion was celebrated at the Garrett home, now the Smith-McDowell House on Victoria Road in Asheville. This period account describes the decorations and the bride's unusual cake, historic features of interest to those planning a modern wedding.
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Record #:
23615
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Manikowski discusses various prominent female historical figures from the Asheville area, such as Lillian Exum Clement Stafford and Elizabeth Blackwell.
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Record #:
23924
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The intersection of Patton and Lexington Avenues is home to one of Asheville's most historic corners. The northwest corner was the site of the Grand Central Hotel during the nineteenth century, the Bon Marche department store from 1910 to 1923, and the S.H. Kress & Co. 5-10-25 Cent Store through 1975.
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Record #:
22144
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Quoting from the writings of two men connected closely with the city--Thomas Wolfe, a native, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, a visitor, Kruse captures the feel of Asheville during a period of American excess--the 1920s--followed by the crash of the 1930s.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 2, Jul 2014, p92-96, 98, 100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
24001
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Joyce Kilmer was an American poet, writer, and Sergeant, and is remembered in this article that details his impressive scouting operations into dangerous territory and his subsequent death in 1918 at the hands of a German sniper.
Record #:
24011
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The Mountaineer Inn is an icon in Asheville; it sprang up after WWII and became a popular motel that is still privately owned today.
Record #:
24024
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The author traces various artistic interpretations of Western North Carolina's landscapes since the 18th century, focusing primarily on William Bartram, who traveled throughout the area in 1775. The painter and botanist observed customs and traditions of the Cherokee, publishing his accounts as 'Travels' in 1791.
Record #:
22715
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
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