NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


50 results for "Wildlife management"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 4
Next
Record #:
28586
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and N.C. State University are tracking black bear movement in and around Asheville. This study is groundbreaking because it studies the habits of urban bears. Biologists have set up traps throughout Asheville and has collect3ed data on 153 different bears over the past three years by outfitting them with GPS radio collars, tattooing the bears, and attaching ear tags. The study will help determine if Asheville lies along a dispersal corridor for bears, as well as a source or sink population bears.
Record #:
28532
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tom Noblett is a volunteer who helps trap bears, tranquilize them, and attach tracking collars to them for the NC Wildlife Resources Commission and the NC State University. Noblett describes his many encounters with bears and gives advice on how to act around them.
Record #:
31318
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author recounts her own encounter with a coyote before continuing on with this piece about coexisting with one of North Carolina’s growing populations of natural predators. It is now confirmed that coyote populations are present in all 100 counties in North Carolina
Full Text:
Record #:
20637
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smallmouth bass are popular with fishermen because of their stamina and fighting ability. Goodfred describes fishing techniques, angling gear, river conditions, and seasonal fishing. He also discusses management of the smallmouth fisheries by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
18568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Research conducted at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Southeastern Focal Area (SEFA) shows that quail populations can be improved with proper wildlife management given enough land, time, and financial commitment from landowners.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24090
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nature Center in Asheville has been in operation for 39 years and has a plan to create a larger wildlife park by 2020. The author presents the successes and future plans of the habitat.
Record #:
11828
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bottlenose dolphins are killed each year when they become entangled in fishermen's nets. In the Chesapeake Bay gear modifications deter dolphins from entanglement. Seiling reports on research results from a regional marine mammal study conducted in Virginia waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2009, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10240
Author(s):
Abstract:
A big challenge in bird conservation is determining how many birds in a given species exist and whether that population is increasing or decreasing. Sorenson discusses the Bird Radio System, developed by Ted Simons, a North Carolina State University ornithologist, to help with this challenge.
Full Text:
Record #:
8871
Abstract:
The Wildlife Action Plan was created by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to address conservation needs of the state over the next decade. In this second of a five-part series, the authors discuss how the plan is being implemented in the state's mountain region.
Full Text:
Record #:
7147
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1992 and 2001, in coastal waters from New Jersey to North Carolina, 210 bottlenose dolphins were killed by becoming entangled in gill nets used by fishermen. The dolphins become entangled either by accidentally running into the nets or by being caught while eating the fishing catch. Angione reports on a study funded by the North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant program to study whether acoustic alarms can keep the dolphins away from the gill nets.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p24-26, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6393
Author(s):
Abstract:
In areas hit hard by storms, including Hurricane Hugo, the population of red-cockaded woodpeckers has declined. This is because the storms wreaked havoc on live, old trees, which the woodpeckers need to build their nest cavities. Now a simple nesting device developed by North Carolina Wildlife Commission non-game biologist David Allen is helping the population recover.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the mid-20th-century, small game, including quail and rabbits, has been declining in the state. To stem this loss, the North Carolina Division of Wildlife and Management established a program called CURE, or Cooperative Upland-Habitat Restoration and Enhancement. Pipkin and Sharpe discuss the program's progress on game lands, including Sandhills, Suggs Mill Pond, South Mountain, and on public lands.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
5217
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loss of habitats threatens bird populations worldwide. In the 1980s, Birdlife International began a program to identify and protect important bird areas in Europe. The program reached the United States in 1995, and North Carolina launched its program in 1998. To date nearly 90 Important Bird Areas (IBAs) have been designated across the state. Though no legal protection is granted by IBA recognition, still it is a blueprint for wildlife conservation.
Full Text:
Record #:
4920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Sea Turtle Protection Program, which is run by the Wildlife Resources Commission, seeks to protect sea turtle nests and hatchlings and to collect mortality data. Comer describes how the Holden Beach Sea Turtle Watch caries out this mission and how stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles are handled.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4990
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Chapter of The Wildlife Society has been named the state chapter of the year for 2000. The Wildlife Society, which was founded in 1937, is a national organization that promotes wise management and conservation of wildlife resources.
Full Text: