NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


32 results for "Research Triangle Park"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
24600
Author(s):
Abstract:
Archie Davis helped found North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park in the 1960s. The park opened with the goals of providing jobs and working for education on and off campus. Throughout its existence, it has done both by working with the nearby universities and by drawing companies, like IBM, to the area.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 4, September 2014, p44-46, 48,50-51, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
27563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recognizing the need to protect the environment has been a big issue in 1989. Some argue that protecting the environment slows economic growth in the Triangle and hurts the working class who need the jobs and the benefits of growth. With this article as an introduction to the 1989 Citizen Awards, The Independent recognizes five individuals and one group who work in the Triangle to protect the environment and the economy in the following articles.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
29643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Technology plays a major role in the way retailers make shopping better, and many of those innovations are made in North Carolina. Self-service kiosks, and other retail technological advances, have been formulated in the IBM's Retail Innovation Center, located in the Research Triangle Park.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 12, Dec 2007, p40, por
Record #:
29658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once known for textiles and tobacco, North Carolina is now renowned for technology. From computers and software to pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, and research trials, top companies in technology and biotechnology are calling the state, particularly the Research Triangle Park, home.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p10, 12-15, por
Record #:
30762
Author(s):
Abstract:
Karl Robbins, a retired textile executive, had his first introduction to North Carolina in the late 1920s as a stockholder in Burlington Mills. Following the development of other mills in the state, Robbins has decided to provide land for the Research Triangle to play a part in North Carolina's future growth.
Source:
Record #:
30934
Author(s):
Abstract:
The natural consequence of the proximity of three outstanding higher-learning institutions, known for their contributions to science, led to the development of the Research Triangle. Distinguished in technology and social and natural science research, the Research Triangle brings together personnel from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, and NC State College in state-of-the-art facilities in the fields of mathematics, physics, chemistry, statistics, and engineering. The Research Triangle aims to provide not only a place of higher learning but economic independence to southern industry through research.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 16 Issue 6, November 1958, p20, 22, 24, 97, map
Record #:
30946
Abstract:
This article demonstrates ways in which Planners can redirect policy goals and visions toward a more equitable form of economic development. Three examples are given of ways planners are promoting living wage standards, job-centered training opportunities and legacy industries.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 40 Issue , 2015, p6-13, il, f
Record #:
31525
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park is home to business firms, government agencies, and modern research facilities, as well as 5,400 acres of landscaping. Since the beginning, the Triangle was planned as an attractive location with the assistance of soil conservationists. A careful landscape plan included conservation measures to prevent erosion and provide a scene of natural beauty.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 5, May 1980, p15, il, por
Record #:
32602
Author(s):
Abstract:
Leaders of government, business, industry, and academia work together at the Research Triangle Park in Raleigh-Durham. For the past twenty-two years, the Research Triangle has enhanced North Carolina’s economy and research potential. An important milestone was the International Business Machines Corporation’s decision to build a complex of research, development and manufacturing.
Source:
Record #:
32603
Author(s):
Abstract:
The growth of the Research Triangle Institute has been cited as a barometer of the Research Triangle Park’s success. Much of the institute’s development and growth can be attributed to its president, George R. Herbert. This article discusses the contributions of the institute to the area’s growth in industry, development and economy.
Source:
Record #:
36255
Author(s):
Abstract:
The life sciences sector provides job growth for areas such as research, development, and manufacturing. It also fuels funding ventures such as business loans from the Biotech Center. Collectively, this data measures the economic and occupational impact this sector makes on North Carolina.
Record #:
36252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rocky Mount’s journey on the road to economic prosperity involved joining the old with the new. Involved with the journey were businesses such as the CSX Carolina Connector Intermodal Rail Terminal and Rocky Mount Mills, predicted to produce substantial job growth.
Record #:
36273
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic and occupational growth in the Tarheel State, partly because of sectors such as banking and higher education, has fed what Hood called North Carolina Exceptionalism. What may be less obvious to those on both side of the political spectrum is the role that the Republican and Democrat parties have played in the growth of such sectors, whether for credit or blame.
Record #:
36276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The silent killer for decades in the farming industry is nematodes. Possibly ridding plants of this microscopic roundworm by 2020 is the root knot nematode experiment. This research project, backed by the Gates Foundation, is being undertaken by AgBiome, a biochemical company in Durham.
Record #:
36285
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s contribution to industries such as biotechnology and its quality of life may define it as a wonderful place to live and work. Supporting this belief were six experts, offering insights about its place in the biotech global market, the importance of industry in the state, appeals the area has to international biotech companies, the importance of workforce training to international biotech companies, and what will keep such companies in North Carolina.