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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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23 results for "Renewable energy sources"
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Record #:
25671
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North Carolina could become the first state to generate wind power from in-water turbines. UNC researchers and Duke Energy have teamed up to install three pilot wind turbines. They are studying the effects of wind farms on fishing industries, public perceptions, and legal implications.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Winter 2010, p30-34, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
30985
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North Carolina’s electric utilities are including natural gas generation as a bigger part of resource plans, along with renewable energy and efficiency measures, in an effort to make up for delayed coal-fired and nuclear generation. This article discusses natural gas consumption in North Carolina, and bridging the gap between now and when advanced low-emissions power generation technologies become available in the future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22115
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Renewable energy sources are important to the state's energy industry. Business North Carolina recently gathered a panel of experts to discuss questions such as the following: How large a role will renewables play in the state's future? How will the industry develop the technologies and labor to operate them? How much support will come from state government?
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Record #:
29652
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North Carolina power companies are moving towards renewable energy, and the state has numerous sources. From animals waste and water, to solar energy and wind, utilizing renewable energy in the state is about finding cost effective technologies that serve the greater good.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 1, Jan 2008, p27--29, por
Record #:
29776
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It may seem easy to just replace nonrenewable energy sources with renewable ones. But in North Carolina even those sources that seem ideal for emissions have drawbacks in the form of land needs, cost, capacity, and even aesthetics.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p18, 20, por
Record #:
30186
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North Carolina has become an important player in renewable energy, with solar and wind farms and other projects attracting billions of dollars. The investment reflects state law requiring utilities to lessen their reliance on coal, natural gas and nuclear sources.
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Record #:
9431
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The 2007 North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation requiring utilities to generate more electricity from renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The law requires that by the year 2018, 10 percent of the electricity that utilities generate and deliver to consumers must be from renewable resources.
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Record #:
28659
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North Carolina’s college students are finding new ways to support sustainable causes on campus. Students from UNC Pembroke and Edgecombe Community College are highlighted for their promotion of sustainable food source and renewable energy sources.
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Record #:
28581
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Carbon Cycle Energy plant is addressing a long-standing goal of turning pig and poultry poop into energy. Construction of the plant began in December near Warsaw in Duplin County, North Carolina, giving great incentive to support development of renewables.
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Record #:
36245
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Discussed was the increasing role that farmers have been playing in the development of renewable energy industries such as solar and wind. Examples profiled were a solar farm owned by Charlotte based Birdseye Renewable Energy LLC, located on a three hundred acre farm in Robeson County. Noted also was Duke’s Dogwood solar farm in Halifax County.
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10263
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Fibrowatt, a Pennsylvania-based energy company, plans to open three poultry waste power plants in North Carolina. Two of the sites will be located in Sampson and Surry counties, and the third to be chosen from either Moore, Montgomery, or Stanly Counties. The plants will provide a way to turn poultry waste into a clean source of renewable energy.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p24, 26, il
Record #:
27964
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The Triangle area is working hard to contribute to a future gasoline-free future. The advances in electric car and battery technology are explored in-depth. Research on the technologies is taking place at North Carolina State University’s FREEDOM Systems Center and the College of Engineering and at Raleigh’s Advanced Vehicle Research Center. Duke Energy and Progress Energy are local utility companies who are committing to leading the way by reducing their use of coal and nuclear power in favor of renewable energy.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 27, July 2010, p15-18 Periodical Website
Record #:
8872
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The North Carolina Utilities Commission requested a major study of the potential benefits of developing renewable energy resources and the possible costs to consumers. Boston-based La Capra Associates, a consulting firm which has advised other states on energy alternatives, conducted the study. The study identified the following renewable resources available in North Carolina: biomass, wind, wood waste, agriculture crop waste, hydropower, and landfill gas. While the list is broad, practical application of these resources in the state is limited.
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Record #:
10311
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North Carolina has the capacity to develop renewable energy in the form of wind power, biomass fuel, and solar power. Currently, the state's traditional energy supplies--coal, oil, natural gas, and uranium--come from other states. The authors discuss state policies that encourage the development of these renewable energies and present some lessons learned from other states.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p12-23, il, map, f
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Record #:
30983
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Over the years, nuclear power plants have been providing a large share of North Carolina’s electricity. As climate change continues to spur both political and public debate, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are supporting the research of new technologies and renewable energy resources in an effort to ensure affordable power while balancing environmental concerns. This article discusses nuclear power generation and its role in the future.
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