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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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53 results for "Gardens and gardening"
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Record #:
30899
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The Hobbit Garden, a two-acre garden outside of Raleigh, is open to the public for tours of the garden’s rare and unusual ornamental plants. Gardeners Willie Pilkington and John Dilley describe the variety of plant species growing in the garden, and offer recommendations on garden design and plants native to North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p18-19, il
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Record #:
31079
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Carolina Country provides a year’s worth of seasonal tips from the gardening guide, Hank Smith. While he considers the variances among North Carolina’s regions, Hank advises gardeners to pay attention to the seasonal conditions affecting their own gardens. In this article, gardeners also share their stories about some strange-looking plants that have grown in their gardens.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, Mar 2005, p11-24, il, por
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Record #:
34509
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In Mount Airy, North Carolina, a couple decides to collaborate with a landscaper to design the perfect gardens to match their quirky house. The front side of the house shows a red brick façade from 1834 that requires a tame, structured garden. The other side is a 20th-century stone addition that requires a whimsical, free-flowing Victorian style garden to go with the kitchen garden.
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Record #:
34806
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As the population of North Carolina becomes more diverse, so too does the variety of greenery and vegetables in gardens all over the state. African and Asian varieties are especially popular, with the introduction of plants like bitter melon, bok choy, cassava, and rice.
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Record #:
34800
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Broccoli is a fairly adaptive vegetable to grow and well-suited for the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow broccoli in your home garden, as well as the best varieties to grow in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34804
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Pears are one of the hardiest and easiest fruiting trees to plant in North Carolina. Not only do they yield fruit early, but they are also cost-effective, can cross-pollinate, and sprout beautiful white flowers in the Spring.
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Record #:
34801
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Cauliflower is a more difficult vegetable to grow but is well-suited for some areas in the Carolinas. This article discusses where, when, and how to grow cauliflower in your home garden, as well as the best places to buy seeds in North Carolina.
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Record #:
34816
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The State of North Carolina has three broad provinces with different soil characteristics—Blue Ridge, Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain. The Blue Ridge area is predominantly metamorphic rock while the Piedmont and Coastal Plain have a clay and sand mixture. Of these two materials, clay is the most difficult to work with. Despite its ability to hold water, clay’s clingy nature can be damaging to plants. The author recommends adding gypsum or compost to clay and silty soils.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 2, March 2016, p17-20, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
34814
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A Wake Forest couple has devoted the past three decades to growing ornamentals, specifically conifers and Japanese maples. These species are difficult to grow in Southern states, but the gardeners have embraced the challenge. Clay soil, in particular, makes growing conifers and maples problematic in humid conditions. To offset the poor soil, the couple have supplemented it with organic material and gypsum. They urge other gardeners to embrace challenges and experiment with different species.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 28 Issue 1, February 2016, p56-58, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34809
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Bacterial spot and bacterial speck have both become large issues for many regions across North and South Carolina. It mostly materializes on tomato plants but can also spread to peppers and eggplants if not properly treated. Spraying and planting in pots can help deter bacterial rot in plants.
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Record #:
34811
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Nan and Saul Chase have cultivated a once-bare plot in Asheville into a thriving kitchen garden. All plants within the tiny .09 acre lot are edible, and include hot peppers, crabapples, berry bushes, and other varieties of vegetable.
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Record #:
34808
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A wide variety of pumpkins can be grown in the Carolinas. They need plenty of space, sun, water, and good soil in order to grow. This article gives tips and tricks to ensuring that your next pumpkin crop is healthy.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 3, April 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34810
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Blueberries are a hardy, versatile fruit-bearing shrub that does well in the Carolinas. This article outlines the ways to grow and care for blueberry bushes and which variety to choose in each climate.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 4, May 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
34825
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Biltmore Estates in Asheville, North Carolina has a long history of stunning landscaping and gardens. Garden designer Clare Whittington discusses their procedure for planning out the gardens that surround the massive 8,000 acre estate, and how home gardeners can use the same tools.
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Record #:
34819
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The author discusses several garden tours in North Carolina ideal for a weekend getaway. Asheville, North Carolina, boasts several gardens including an arboretum, boulder garden, and “remediation” garden established to clean retired industrial areas. In contrast, several gardens around Edenton, North Carolina, have been cultivated into exquisite English period gardens which emphasize the area’s colonial history.
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