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14 results for "Beach erosion"
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Record #:
10310
Abstract:
Crawford-Douglas poses questions to help communities in North Carolina sort through issues brought on by global warming. These include: Why should there be any action? Who should take action? How can policy makers allocate resources to adaptation or mitigation? How can North Carolinians set priorities?
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p2-9, il, f
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Record #:
7244
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Sturgis paints a grim future for North Carolina's Outer Banks and coastal counties in the twenty-first century. Global warming is predicted to produce rising oceans levels from fourteen inches to three feet, temperature ranges from four to ten degrees higher than current levels, and more powerful tropical storms. Climate change is a vast and serious problem, but in North Carolina many organizations are bringing people together to address this critical problem. Senate Bill 1134 and House Bill 1191 would establish a commission drawn from these various groups to study the problem. Both this group and the proposed legislation faces opposition from politically powerful corporate interests. Meanwhile, the state's coastline continues to erode.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 19, May 2005, p22-27, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6765
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Stan Riggs, an East Carolina University distinguished research professor, has spent thirty years trekking through soggy swamps, muddy marshes, and hot beaches to gather data on erosion rates along North Carolina's 4,000 miles of coastal and estuarine shorelines. His work has ranged through state, national, and international projects. In 1983, he received the O. Max Gardner Award, which is presented annually to the University of North Carolina system faculty member \"who has made the greatest contribution to the welfare of the human race.\" Green interviews Riggs about his lifelong coastal research.
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Record #:
31225
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North Carolina’s beaches and sand dunes are vulnerable to erosion, and therefore depend on sea oats and beach grass for stabilization. David Nash, a doctoral candidate at North Carolina State University, is growing sea oats that may not only help stabilize sand dunes, but also offer farmers an alternative crop. Nash applied tobacco germination techniques to develop a float system for cultivating local sea oat seeds.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 6, June 2001, p16-17, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4654
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Beach erosion is constant. To deal with it, the Coastal Resources Commission uses building relocation and beach renourishment (moving sand from others areas onto eroded beaches). Bulldozing is used as an emergency. Sandbagging is used as a temporary fix. Beach renourishment is controversial, and Smith summarizes the views of the public and environmentalists.
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Record #:
3227
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In 1996, Hurricane Fran wreaked havoc on the southern barrier islands, eroding many beach areas and destroying property. While most beaches will recover, some will require ten to fifteen years. Pre-1960s-built homes suffered the most damage.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1997, p2-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1406
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Abstract:
As North Carolina's coastal communities attempt to deal with beach erosion, beach nourishment appears to be an alternative. High costs and imperfectly understood long-term effects, however, are clear drawbacks.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1994, p19-22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
19178
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Abstract:
North Carolina's coast is extremely dynamic and the risks of beach erosion are constant. Although there are some areas of the coast that are accreting, or gaining width, the majority of the coastal runs the risk of being lost into the ocean.
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Record #:
26761
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Artificial seaweed planted offshore from the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is responsible for a buildup of sand around the historic structure. This indicates successful efforts to protect the area from beach erosion.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1983, p9
Record #:
26838
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Seascape is the trade-name for a tubular device aimed at building an artificial reef in front of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. Divers, surfers, and volunteers assisted the National Park Service in moving sand-filled tubes parallel to the beach. The tubes serve as anchors to attached fronds designed to catch sand and thereby help to prevent beach erosion.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1981, p8, il
Record #:
31510
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Abstract:
When the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was threatened by storms and beach erosion last winter, a 150-foot strip of sandbags and rubble was installed near the base of the historic landmark. Efforts are now being organized to provide permanent protection for the lighthouse. Proposals include building a circular revetment around the lighthouse’s base, moving the lighthouse, or extending the present groins and pumping new sand onto the beach.
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Record #:
31592
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North Carolina’s environmental beach clinics started as an experiment by the Soil Conservation Service four years and continue to be successful. The purpose of the beach clinics was to promote the use of newly developed beach grasses and other vegetation to protect dunes and ocean-front property from eroding or washing away. Participants in the beach clinics learn about native vegetation, planting techniques, and coastal erosion.
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Record #:
9992
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Carlton Davenport, a coastal engineer and landowner from Hertford, has noted the devastating effect of beach erosion along North Carolina's coastline. Davenport says, “The proper way to fight erosion is by a joint effort of property owners,” but the exceeding costs and lack of preventative measures taken are threatening the existence of some beaches and islands in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 10, Mar 1974, p11-12, por
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Record #:
24673
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The author provides an inventory of progress at North Carolina’s ocean resorts and local beaches. Much of the article focuses on beach restoration practices, such as creating artificial dunes to keep shorelines from shifting.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 20, February 1955, p30-33, il
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