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6 results for Coast changes
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Record #:
463
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Abstract:
Enormous population growth in coastal counties will cause severe problems for local governments in the upcoming years.
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Record #:
4393
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Between the state's barrier islands are twenty- two inlets, stretching from Oregon Inlet in the northern Outer Banks to Mad Inlet near the South Carolina border. Inlets are more than just openings where the ocean flows in and out. They are dynamic places were the tidal currents try to deepen the channel while ocean waves carry sand to fill it up. Whichever force is dominant determines whether the inlet widens or closes up.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 1999, p24-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6765
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Abstract:
Stan Riggs, an East Carolina University distinguished research professor, has spent thirty years trekking through soggy swamps, muddy marshes, and hot beaches to gather data on erosion rates along North Carolina's 4,000 miles of coastal and estuarine shorelines. His work has ranged through state, national, and international projects. In 1983, he received the O. Max Gardner Award, which is presented annually to the University of North Carolina system faculty member \"who has made the greatest contribution to the welfare of the human race.\" Green interviews Riggs about his lifelong coastal research.
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Record #:
25005
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Find out what exactly Sea Grant is and how it came to be. In addition find out where more can be learned about Sea Grant.
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Record #:
5899
Author(s):
Abstract:
A powerful hurricane created Oregon Inlet in 1846. Throughout its existence the inlet has been known as the East Coast's most dangerous maritime passageway. Just keeping it open today for charter, commercial, and recreational boats is a challenge for local, state, and federal officials. Powell discusses what is being done to keep this doorway to the Atlantic open.
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Record #:
36002
Abstract:
High winds and tides had worn down the terrain, but human activities had played a great part in the erosion of sand dunes and beaches. Having some control over the latter spurred residents to plan ways to preserve the sandy shores of their island home. Among the efforts: prohibiting vehicles without four weight bearing wheels on beaches; increasing parking spaces to incite pedestrian beach access; and closing certain areas seasonally and year around.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p2-5