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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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15 results for Gotwals, Lissa
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Record #:
21004
Abstract:
Most of Durham's best-loved bakeries are located within an area known as the Durham Bakery District. This area is helping to revitalize the city's downtown. Among the bakeries described are DaiseyCakes, Loaf Bakery, Monuts Donuts, Ninth Street Bakery, and Scratch Bakery.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 6, Nov 2013, p201-204, 206-207, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21428
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Marie Evans of Welcome in Davidson County had several artistic jobs before settling on the one for which she is known--miniatures. She studied painting at Virginia Commonwealth University, then went to New York City to pursue dance. Later, she spent thirteen years with The Lost Colony, and then made stained-glass windows. Her miniatures are pet portraits made in a three-dimensional likeness of the customer's dog or cat, down to the smallest details. She has created around 800 of the little animals that are ordered from all over the world. She also makes soft sculpture dolls.
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Record #:
21429
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Black describes a movement that's afoot in the state, the Little Free Library, a nationwide movement that began in Wisconsin in 2009. The little wooden boxes on poles may look like birdhouses, but they're not. There are 2,510 of them scattered across the country by August 2012 and neighbors and visitors just take a book and leave a book.
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Record #:
21784
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Charleen Swansea graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1956, taught there for one year, then at Queens College in Charlotte until 1964. She was fired from the college for being \"too courageously creative.\" She and her students then formed a writing group and created the Red Clay Reader, a magazine for writers with deep roots in the Southern soil. It had a run of seven years. She then founded her own publishing company, Red Clay Publishers, which has printed 32 books by Southern writers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p36, 38-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22111
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Ricky Moore grew up a military brat in Eastern NC and other places and later served ten years in the US Army. Using his G.I. benefits he went to the Culinary Institute of America in upstate New York. He later applied his skills in Chicago and Washington, D.C., the Apicius in Paris, France and the acclaimed Daniel in New York City. He also competed on \"Iron Chef America.\" Moore could have gone anywhere in the world but he chose to come back home to NC. Lucas describes the popular no frills Saltbox Seafood Joint that Moore opened in the Old Five Points neighborhood in Durham.
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Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p229-230, 232, 234, il, por
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Record #:
22224
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Chapel Hill artist Elaine O'Neil specializes in a particular art form--textiles. From a distance her work appears to be a painting, but on closer inspection the viewer discovers that it's a textile collage--a work made up of many pieces of cotton, wool, velvet, and silk.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22251
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It's a different looking, small ribbed green pod that is edible. It's has a slimy-when-cooked-texture and might be the vegetable from another planet. But it has wound its way onto the palette of Southern eaters who devour it fried, raw, or in Brunswick stews and gumbos. It's okra!
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p114-118, 120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22246
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Pepsi Cola is a North Carolina classic. Concocted by druggist Caleb Bradham in 1893 in New Bern, the soft drink has become one of America's enduring symbols. Mims recounts its history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p80-84, 86, 88, 90 Periodical Website
Record #:
22248
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Redeye gravy is another Southern delicacy. Shestak describes what it is, how it is prepared, and how a diner eats it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p100-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22601
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In North Carolina, restaurants are making cultural flavors more accessible through a common food: the sandwich. In Charlotte, Durham, Carrboro, and Greensboro markets and sandwich shops are bringing French, Bosnian, Cuban, Middle Eastern, and Vietnamese flare to a classic dish.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 9, February 2015, p110-114, 116, 118, il Periodical Website
Record #:
21623
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Piebird's, a restaurant located on Person Street in Raleigh, takes its name from the ceramic device that can be tucked into a pie to vent steam. Sheilagh Duncan opened her eating establishment in 2011, although regulars and others warned her that it would not succeed. However, its quirky appeal quickly caught on and soon became a fixture near the Mordecai and Oakwood neighborhoods. Lucas describes the restaurants offerings and operations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p102-104, 106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21692
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Southerners love their fried chicken, and it's almost heresy to consider putting a sauce on it or eating it with a knife and fork.However, their savory delight is now being served at some restaurants with honey and other sweet stuff on it and it is sitting atop a waffle! Enter the new menu item--fried chicken and waffles. Lucas describes this new delicacy and some of the restaurants in the Triangle that serve it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p219-222, 224-225, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22247
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Kelly describes a Southern delicacy popular in North Carolina and across the South -- boiled peanuts, pronounced boil' peanuts. They are an acquired taste for some, but they cross the food cultures from arugula eaters to chitlin' lovers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 3, Aug 2014, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
29161
Abstract:
Once a ubitquitous sight in the North Carolina countryside until the 1960s, mules have been mostly supplanted by tractors and mechanization. But Wayne Hussey's mules are still talk of the town at Benson's Mules Days, which celebrates its 68th anniversary.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 4, September 2017, p192-194, 196, 198, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27288
Abstract:
People have attempted farming in the Mountains for North Carolina for years. This series of articles highlights different farms in the mountains and different crops, including herbs, apples, carrots, and livestock.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p166-168, 170,172,174-180, il, por Periodical Website
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